Valve’s Steam Deck handheld delayed by chip drought that has led to PS5 and Switch shortage

The game company estimates that the Deck will start shipping to customers in February 2022

Adam Smith
Friday 12 November 2021 14:33
Comments

Valve’s Steam Deck, its handheld gaming device, is being delayed by two months because of the chip shortage.

“We’re sorry about this — we did our best to work around the global supply chain issues, but due to material shortages, components aren’t reaching our manufacturing facilities in time for us to meet our initial launch dates,” Valve said in a blog post.

The company estimates that the Deck will start shipping to customers in February 2022, with those who reserved their gadget the soonest receiving it first.

“While we did our best to account for the global supply chain issues (by which we mean we factored in extra time to account for these risks and worked with multiple component vendors), our manufacturing plans were still impacted”, the video game company said in its FAQ.

“Material shortages and delays meant that components weren’t making it to our manufacturing facilities on time. Missing parts along with logistical challenges means delayed Steam Decks, so we needed to push out shipping”

The chip shortage has affected numerous industries, including Steam’s competitors in the gaming space such as Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo – with the Japanese manufacturer of the Switch handheld warning that it would be shipping fewer machines because of the issues.

“The extended impact of both Covid-19 and the global semiconductor shortage creates a state of continued uncertainty, with the possibility of future impact on production and shipping”, Nintendo said.

The PlayStation 5 has remained in short supply over the past months, and is expected to get worse.

The company had aimed to make 16 million PlayStation 5s between April 2021 and March 2022, but now expects to only make 15 million, according to a new report. Microsoft’s supple of the Xbox Series X has been experiencing similar issues, although the company says it has shipped more consoles than it expected.

Apple, too, is reportedly expecting to sell 10 million fewer iPhone 13 models.

Overall, the shortage has hit around 169 different industries this year, including concrete mixing companies, household appliances, and car manufacturer.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged in