Mother sparks outrage after labelling hyphenated names ‘lower-class’

‘I really dislike them’

Olivia Petter
Friday 16 February 2018 10:24 GMT
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A British mother has prompted a furore online by declaring hyphenated children’s names “lower-class”.

The woman expressed her animosity in response to a post on Netmums which asked members for their views on double-barrelled monikers.

“I live in an area where half the children at school live in council houses. I don't know any child with a hyphenated name that doesn't live in one of them,” she wrote.

She cited the name “Ava-May” as an example before labelling “J-Lex” as “the worst”.

“There's a considerable number of girls with May, Rose, Leigh etc. tagged on the end. Majority don't use them daily,” she added.

“So yes, I see them as lower class. And I hate them even more when the poor kid has a double barrelled surname as well.”

Some users agreed with her, with one writing: “They’re considered chavvy in my area too.”

Others labelled hyphenated names as “common” and “pretentious”.

However, the majority of respondents took issue with the woman’s comments, citing them as “ridiculous”.

Many criticised her inference that those living on council estates were “lower class”.

“I can bet my bottom dollar you are working class just like those that live in council houses,” wrote one user.

“I am a social worker and so frequent council houses most days... its occupants aren’t a lower class than me”.

“Lower class? Wow. My name is double-barrelled - Carol-Ann. I have a mortgage on quite a large house which i have owned since I was 23 years old and a career in a job that pays well,” added another.

“A 'symbol in the middle of a name' doesn't define a person. What a ridiculous comment to make.”

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