Drinking three to five cups of a coffee a day could reduce risk of heart attacks, study finds

People drinking high levels of coffee are less likely to develop clogged arteries, which can lead to a heart attack

Loulla-Mae Eleftheriou-Smith
Tuesday 03 March 2015 09:41
Comments

People who drink between three and five cups of coffee a day could be reducing their risk of a heart attack, as they are less likely to develop clogged arteries, according to a new study.

Though there has been much debate around effects of excessive coffee drinking on cardiovascular health, the study found that coffee consumption could be “inversely associated” with the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Researchers studied a group of more than 25,000 Korean men and women with no signs of heart disease and an average age of 41.

They found the prevalence of detectable CAC was 13.4% amongst the whole group while the average amount of coffee drunk was 1.8 cups per day.

Their findings showed the calcium ratios were 0.77 for people who had less than one cup per day, 0.66 for those having one to three cups every day, 0.59 for those consuming three to five cups per day, and 0.81 for people having at least five cups or more every day compared with non-coffee drinkers.

The U-shaped findings meant that those who drank one to three coffees a day had the second least prevalence of arteries that had clogged up.

The findings were published in the online journal Heart, where the authors stated: “Our study adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that coffee consumption might be inversely associated with cardiovascular disease risk.

“Further research is warranted to confirm our finding and establish the biological basis of coffee’s potential preventative effects on coronary artery disease.”

The research appears to support the findings of a 2012 set of studies, which the NHS said suggested that, “compared to no coffee consumption, four to five servings of coffee a day was associated with an 11 per cent lower risk (of heart failure),” while “drinking excessive amounts of coffee had no benefit – and is likely to give you the jitters,” though the health service said information should be viewed with caution.

In response to the current study, Victoria Taylor, senior dietitian at the British Heart Foundation, said: “While this study does highlight a potential link between coffee consumption and lower risk of developing clogged arteries, more research is needed to confirm these findings and understand what the reason is for the association.

”We need to take care when generalising these results because it is based on the South Korean population, who have a different diet and lifestyle."

Additional reporting by PA

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in