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How the average man's body has changed since 1967

Today's men are bigger in all senses

Rachel Hosie
Thursday 30 March 2017 12:47
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Much like women, men’s bodies have changed a lot over time.

And new research reveals just how drastic this change has been.

Over the last 50 years ago, the average British man has grown three inches taller, weighs 23lbs more and has developed a paunch.

(Forza Supplements

In 1967, Mr Average was 5ft 7.5in tall, weighed 11st 8lbs and had a chest of 38 inches and a waist of 34 inches.

He had size seven feet, a collar size of 14.5 and a life expectancy of just 68.

Fast forward 50 years, however, and British men have grown significantly.

The average British man is now 5ft 10in tall, weighs 13st 3lbs and has a chest of 43in and a waist of 37in.

He wears size nine shoes, has a collar size of 16 and is expected to live to the age of 81 - 13 years longer. This is just two years behind the life expectancy of women.

The research to uncover the figures was undertaken by health and wellbeing brand Forza Supplements, who studied government statistics to draw their conclusions.

They suggest that British men have got simultaneously fatter and more buff, reflected in larger waists but also wider chests and necks.

(Forza Supplements

Lee Smith, Forza Supplements managing director, says: “It is extraordinary how much Mr Average has changed in the last 50 years.

“He has gone from being what we might consider a bit of wimp these days into a taller, more rugged muscleman but with a noticeable beer belly.

“He is also a lot healthier than his 1967 counterpart - living 13 years longer.”

The researchers point out that 53 per cent of men smoked in 1967, whereas only 20 per cent do nowadays.

British men are also eating 500 calories more a day on average, from 2,000 to 2,500.

“[Today's man] is far more conscious of his body image. Around 42% of British men lift weights at least once a month these days compared to just 2% of men in the sixties,” Smith says.

“Whereas British men are far fitter than they were, they are also far fatter, because they are richer and they are eating and drinking far more than they used to.”

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