Megan Thee Stallion partners with Nike to share her fitness journey

‘People like to tell us what we can and can’t do. But we ain’t hearing that,’ she states

Megan Thee Stallion collaborates with Nike

Megan Thee Stallion has joined forces with Nike in a bid to empower women on their fitness journeys.

The “Hot Girl Summer” singer revealed her new relationship with the sports brand on Thursday, sharing a video which speaks about her own experience with sports and fitness.

The video shows the rapper sitting at a desk in a Nike T-shirt, as she launches into her story.

The Grammy-award winning artist opens a pop-up book representing her rise to fame, saying: “I know I make this all look so easy, but this didn't happen overnight.”

In a voiceover, the 26-year-old is heard reflecting on growing up as “a young girl in Houston just trying to find her way”, and the comments she received about her body and what types of sport she would and wouldn’t be suited to.

One person comments on the rapper’s height (5’10’’), remarking: “Girl, you tall. You need to be playing basketball”.

Another observer states that she would be better suited to volleyball, while a third adds, “With those legs, you need to run track!”

“And I tried them all,” Stallion responds, “but they just weren't for me.”

“I knew I had to find my passion and do what made me happy,” she continues.

The video then moves to a gym coach blowing a whistle and stating disparagingly: “But I wouldn't call you an athlete.”

The “Savage” star responds to the negative comments by turning the next page of her book to show her crushing the gym coach and revealing Stallion [her stage persona] and a troupe of dancers breaking into a dance routine.

“Let's see you run through 12-hour dance rehearsals,” she retorts. “Train five days a week. Then perform in front of 50,000 people... squatting 50 per cent of the time!”

In the next montage, the rapper can be seen engaged in various athletic pursuits, such as lifting weights, running and performing yoga poses, before switching to the rapper onstage in the middle of a concert watched by thousands of screaming fans.

“People like to tell us what we can and can't do,” she continues. “But we ain't hearing that. Real hot girls know, no one can define us but us.”

With that, Stallion closes the book and says: “So hotties, you ready?“

In a caption accompanying the post, the “Thot Sh*t” singer writes: “HOTTIES WE ARE OFFICIALLY NIKE HOTTIES. I told y'all, Real Hotties put other Hotties on! So I'm sharing my fitness story to let you know sport is whatever ya want it to be.”

The campaign comes as Nike announced cuts to revenue forecasts due to shipping and production delays.

Factory closures in Vietnam may impact the global brand’s ability to meet demand leading up to the Christmas period, according to a report by Bloomberg.

A Covid resurgence throughout the southeast Asian country has led to factories shutting down, affecting productivity for other brands, such as Adidas and Puma.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in