Roe v Wade struck down: Where to donate to abortion funds right now

Supreme Court has ruled in favour of a Mississippi law banning abortion at 15 weeks of pregnancy, overturning a 50-year precedent set by Roe v Wade

Roe v Wade overturned: Pro-life and pro-choice groups gather outside Supreme Court

The Supreme Court has voted to overturn Roe v Wade. Now, millions of Americans are turning to abortion funds as a last chance to protect abortion access in the United States.

On 24 June, the nation’s highest court struck down a 50-year precedent set by Roe v Wade when it issued a ruling in the 2018 case Dobbs v Jackson Women’s Health Organization. The Supreme Court voted in favour of the state of Mississippi blocking abortion at 15 weeks of pregnancy, deciding that there is no constitutional right to abortion despite decades of federal protections for abortion access since 1973.

The highly anticipated decision comes after Politico leaked a Supreme Court draft decision in Dobbs on 2 May. The leaked opinion draft, which appeared to be authored by Justice Samuel Alito, showed that the court’s conservative majority voted to overturn key rulings Roe and Planned Parenthood v Casey after hearing oral arguments in the case of Dobbs v Jackson Women’s Health Organization.

“We hold that Roe and Casey must be overruled,” he wrote. “It is time to heed the Constitution and return the issue of abortion to the people’s elected representatives”.

With Roe overturned, the right to an abortion is in the hands of state lawmakers. With several states in the south and midwest already following in Mississippi’s footsteps, it’s likely that abortion will become illegal in at least 26 states. This means that forty-one per cent of women of childbearing age will see their nearest abortion clinic close, forcing them to travel an average of 279 miles to access abortion care.

While states like New York and California have already fortified legal protections for abortion patients, there are 13 states with so-called “trigger” bans – laws designed to take effect once Roe is overturned – that could immediately or quickly outlaw abortion. Other states have passed “pre-Roe” abortion bans before 1973, which could be re-enacted once Roe is overturned.

The most effective way to take a stand against the Supreme Court’s ruling is by donating to an abortion fund, a non-profit organisation that provides financial and logistical assistance for patients who cannot afford the costs of an abortion.

Since the leaked opinion draft was published last month, abortion funds and pro-choice organisations have seen a spike in donations. The Abortion Care Network – a national organisation which aims to support independent abortion care providers – raised $260,000 just days after the court’s draft decision was leaked, according to NPR.

Meanwhile, NARAL Pro-Choice America, which has fought for reproductive freedom since 1977, saw a 1,400 per cent increase in donations the day after Politico first published the draft opinion.

Other nationally-renowned abortion funds to support include Indigenous Women Rising, which provides abortions to Indigenous communities throughout the country. The Women’s Reproductive Rights Assistance Project helps fund abortion services for individuals who are unable to cover the cost of a procedure. And the National Network of Abortion Funds makes it easy to donate to a number of pro-choice organisations across the country, by splitting donations evenly among abortion funds that need it most.

But it doesn’t stop there.

According to the Center for Reproductive Rights, these are the 26 states characterised as being in “hostile” condition, meaning they could immediately prohibit abortion entirely once Roe v Wade is overturned. Here is a list of abortion funds to donate to in these states, per the National Network of Abortion Funds.

Alabama

Yellowhammer Fund, Alabama Cohosh Collaborative

In 2019, Alabama enacted a total ban on abortion that would criminalise providing abortion care. The ban is currently blocked from taking effect.

Arizona

Abortion Fund of Arizona

In March 2022, Arizona enacted a 15-week ban on abortion which is currently in effect, with no exceptions for rape or incest. The state also has a pre-Roe ban on abortion.

Arkansas

Arkansas Abortion Support Network

In 2021, Arkansas was blocked from enacting a total ban on abortion that would criminialise providing abortion care if enforced. Arkansas also has a trigger law and pre-Roe ban on abortion.

Georgia

Access Reproductive Care - Southeast

People in Georgia can access an abortion up to 20 weeks into their pregnancy. But in May 2019, the state’s governor signed a bill that, once it becomes enforceable, bans abortions when a fetal heartbeat is detected.

Idaho

Northwest Abortion Access Fund

The state of Idaho has a trigger law that makes it a felony to perform an abortion or attempt to perform an abortion. Abortion care providers could face up to five years in prison if the trigger law is enacted.

Indiana

All-Options Hoosier Abortion Fund

Indiana has placed many medically unnecessary restrictions on abortion, making it difficult for people to access abortion care in the state. Pregnant people who seek abortion care in Indiana must undergo biased counseling, an 18-hour mandatory waiting period, an ultrasound, and receive consent to a minor’s abortion, according to the Center for Reproductive Rights.

Iowa

Iowa Abortion Access Fund, Deprosse Access Fund of the Emma Goldman Clinic

Iowa currently bans most abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy, but Republican lawmakers have passed several restrictions on abortions in recent years. In 2018, the Iowa Supreme Court issued a ruling protecting abortion rights, but has since overruled itself this past year.

Kentucky

Kentucky Health Justice Network, A Fund

In 2019, Kentucky enacted a trigger law intended to make abortion illegal once Roe is overturned. The state also passed a sweeping anti-abortion law that effectively forced the state’s remaining clinics to close, even with Roe protections in place.

Louisiana

New Orleans Abortion Fund, The Rabbi Ronald Goldstein Fund

The state’s trigger law bans providers from performing an abortion or providing abortion medication in almost all situations if ever legally permissible.

Michigan

Reclaim MI WIN Fund

Last month, a Michigan judge suspended the state’s pre-Roe abortion ban from 1931. However, access to abortion in the state remains restricted by mandatory 24-hour waiting periods, biased counseling, limited public funding for abortion care, and refusal to accept private insurance coverage for an abortion.

Mississippi

Mississippi Reproductive Freedom Fund

Under Mississippi’s trigger ban, abortions are illegal in the state except in cases of rape or when the procedure could save the mother’s life. Mississippi also has a pre-Roe ban on abortion, which could be used to prohibit abortion in nearly all situations if allowed to be enforced.

Missouri

Missouri Abortion Fund, Right By You

In 2019, Missouri enacted a trigger ban that makes abortion care a felony except in cases of medical emergencies.

Nebraska

Abortion Access Fund, Nebraska Abortion Resources (NEAR)

Nebraska law prohibits an abortion after 20 weeks post-fertilisation. The state has also placed numerous restrictions on abortion, including a mandatory 24-hour waiting period, biased counseling, and an ultrasound at least one hour before an abortion. Nebraska also limits public funding for an abortion and private insurance coverage for an abortion.

North Carolina

Carolina Abortion Fund

North Carolina currently has a pre-Roe ban that could prevent abortion in the state if enforced. North Carolina also has passed a number of abortion restrictions, including a mandatory 72-hour waiting period and required abortion counseling.

South Carolina

Carolina Abortion Fund

In 2021, South Carolina passed a six-week ban, which was blocked by the state courts. If Roe is overturned, this six-week ban could go into effect.

North Dakota

The North Dakota Women in Need Abortion Access Fund

North Dakota enacted a trigger law in 2007, which makes abortion care a felony except in cases where the procedure could save the mother’s life.

South Dakota

The Justice Through Empowerment Network

The state also passed a trigger law in 2005 trigger law. If enacted, it would be illegal for providers to perform an abortion in almost all cases. The measure will immediately go into effect “on the date states are recognised by the United States Supreme Court to have the authority to prohibit abortion at all stages of pregnancy.”

Ohio

Preterm Access Fund, The Agnes Reynolds Jackson Fund, Women Have Options

In 2019, Ohio enacted a six-week ban on abortion, prohibiting the procedure before many people know they are pregnant. If Roe is overturned, this six-week ban could go into effect.

Oklahoma

Roe Fund

In April 2022, Oklahoma passed a near-total abortion ban that is not yet in effect. The state law makes abortion care a felony punishable up to 10 years in prison with a fine of up to $100,000, and does not make exceptions for abortions from rape or incest. Oklahoma has also passed a separate measure banning abortion at six weeks of pregnancy, as well as a trigger law.

Pennsylvania

Abortion Liberation Fund of PA, Western Pennsylvania Fund for Choice

While abortion access in the state is considered “hostile” by the Center for Reproductive Justice, abortion will likely remain accessible in Pennsylvania but without legal protection.

Tennessee

Abortion Care Tennessee, Mountain Access Brigade

Tennessee’s trigger law, which makes abortion care a felony in nearly all cases, goes into effect within 30 days after Roe is overturned.

Texas

Texas Equal Access Fund, The Afiya Center, The Stigma Relief Fund, The Lilith Fund, Fund Texas Choice, Clinic Access Support Network

In 2021, Texas enacted a trigger ban for abortions in nearly all cases, which goes into effect 30 days after Roe is overturned. The state also has a six-week ban on abortion, which has been in effect since 1 September.

Utah

Utah Abortion Fund

The state’s 2020 trigger ban makes abortion care a second-degree felony and outlaws all abortions except in cases of rape or incest, detection of severe birth defects, or to prevent the mother’s death or serious injury.

West Virginia

Holler Health Justice, Women’s Health Center of West Virginia Choice Fund

In 2018, West Virginia passed an amendment to the state constitution prohibiting the right to an abortion.

Wisconsin

Women’s Medical Fund, Freedom Fund, Options Fund, Our Justice’s Abortion Assistance Fund

Wisconsin currently has an unenforced pre-Roe ban and does not express constitutional protection for abortion under law.

Wyoming

Chelsea’s Fund

In March 2022, Wyoming passed a trigger ban that makes it illegal to perform an abortion and prohibits abortion in almost all situations if enacted.

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