An extra five minutes should boost your energy levels right? Wrong
An extra five minutes should boost your energy levels right? Wrong

Why hitting the snooze button can actually make you more tired

Those few extra minutes could actually do more harm than good

Sarah Young
Thursday 03 November 2016 15:11
Comments

No matter how much sleep you get it never feels like quite enough. Logically, hitting snooze to tack on an extra five or ten minutes should boost your energy levels right?

Wrong. According to experts, instead of giving you a kick, napping after your alarm goes off can actually increase tiredness and make you feel drowsy.

This is because the time between buzzes is so narrow that your body doesn’t have enough time to fall back into a deep sleep. What’s more, the lack of routine causes your brain to become confused about what the alarm actually means and messes with your body clock.

It’s a theory supported by many, including behavioural scientist Dan Ariely. Writing in his advice column in the Wall Street Journal he said, “Set your alarm for exactly the time you need to get up.”

“Since you want to start your day at 7am, you may be tempted to set the alarm a bit early – let’s say 6.40am –and hit snooze a few times until it is 7am or maybe even 7.15am. But if you pick this snooze strategy, your body can’t learn the conditioned response between hearing the alarm and getting up”, he adds.

No matter how much sleep you get it never feels like quite enough

“In general, our bodies do better when they can get used to a single clear rule – get out of bed the moment the alarm sounds.

“When we play with the snooze button, our bodies get a confused message – sometimes we hear the beeping and get up, sometimes we hear it and stay put for 10 more minutes, sometimes we lie there for another 20 minutes, and so on.”

It’s all too tempting to revel in the sheets for just a bit longer but those few extra minutes could actually do more harm than good.

If you’re not ready to get out of bed it probably means you didn’t get enough sleep so start by making sure you get the recommended seven to nine hours kip.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged in