The importance of regular eye testing

Eye examinations don’t just tell you whether you need glasses, they can also detect underlying eye conditions and other health problems…

Eye tests aren’t just about making sure you can see properly right now, they’re about protecting your eye health – and ultimately your vision – in the long term. Research by Specsavers and Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) found 13.8 million people in the UK aren’t having their eyes tested every two years, as recommended by optometrists.

As National Eye Health Week begins, Specsavers has teamed up with RNIB to help people understand the importance of looking after their eyes.

While we may be aware how important it is to be able to see clearly, having good vision doesn’t necessarily mean that your eyes are completely healthy, and the only way to be sure of this is to have regular check-ups.

At Specsavers, an eye test is about more than just checking how well you can see. We've identified some of the eye underlying conditions and health problems that can be brought to light by an eye test.

Glaucoma: An eye examination can reveal early signs of glaucoma. Early detection and treatment can reduce the risk of vision loss.

High blood pressure: If your blood pressure is raised this may be apparent when an optometrist examines the blood vessels in the back of your eye.

Age-related macular degeneration: This eye condition can cause loss of central vision and can be detected by looking for changes to your retina during an eye examination. Some types can be slowed down with the right treatment.

Diabetes: As many as 550,000 people in the UK have undiagnosed diabetes, which can lead to sight loss. An eye examination can detect the first signs.

Cataracts: Your optometrist can make sure you are referred for treatment for your cataracts at the right time, usually when they are making day-to-day activities difficult.

Cardiovascular disease: Eye examinations can pick up signs of cardiovascular disease, such as high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Treatment from your doctor can reduce the risk of stroke.

Source: RNIB and Specsavers State of the Nation Report – Eye Health 2016. YouGov plc online omnibus survey of 10,000 people, July 2016. A regular test is at least once every two years.

There's no better time to have a check-up than National Eye Health Week, so visit www.specsavers.co.uk/stores to book an appointment today!

* This content was commissioned and controlled by Specsavers.

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