Lana Condor’s wedding beauty routine involves gua sha - but what is it?

The actor got engaged to Anthony De La Torre in January

Lana Condor has revealed what her beauty routine looks like as she prepares for her wedding to Anthony De La Torre.

Actor Condor, 24, announced her engagement to singer De La Torre, 28, in January this year.

“Saying YES was the easiest decision I’ve ever made. I consider myself the absolute luckiest woman alive to live in your sphere,” the To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before star captioned her Instagram post announcing the engagement.

She noted that her oval-shaped diamond engagement ring was made by female-owned company, Paris Jewellers.

While Condor has yet to reveal a wedding date, she has revealed what beauty steps she’s taking as she prepares for their wedding — and it involves gua sha.

“I’m going to drink a lot of water,” Condor told People. “I actually carry around a gallon with me when I work because I really genuinely think that drinking water helps my skin not dull. I’m also going to use my gua sha. I’m definitely going to do masks because the morning of [the wedding], I want to be as relaxed as possible.”

What is gua sha?

Gua sha is the practice of scraping the skin with a tool. Like a facial roller but flat, the tool is often made from rose quartz or jade crystal and helps with lymphatic drainage and circulation. It can be used all over the body, not just the face.

Gua sha has eastern origins and it was used during folk therapy by the ancient Chinese as well as during the Ming Dynasty as a medical practice between the 14th and 17th centuries.

Present-day, the tool is loved by Gen Z beauty buffs — the #guasha hashtag has 909.7 million views on TikTok with users raving about its benefits.

Gua sha tools are usually made from rose quartz or jade

What benefits does gua sha have?

While TikTokers claim gua sha can help give you a more defined jawline, the main benefits of gua sha include promoting blood circulation, relieving muscle tenstion and promoting lymphatic drainage, or fluid build up.

Lymphatic drainage can reduce puffiness which, if you use the gua sha along your jawline, temporarily gives the appearance of a more defined jaw.

A study from 2016 found that those with weak immune systems should try gua sha as the practice can “up-regulate the innate and adaptive immune functions of the skin and boost the response against intradermal antigens”.

How do you use a gua sha tool?

Facial gua sha should be performed in the direction of lymph flow for the best results. This means starting at your neck and working your way up.

The tool should be moved up and down your neck first before using it in an outwards direction from the centre of your face. It should be used along the jawline, in an upwards motion from the lips, along the cheekbones, along the eyebrows and in an upwards motion on the forehead.

Looking to buy a gua sha tool? IndyBest has found the best facial massage tools to sculpt and de-puff skin.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in