Hilary Duff responds to kids who confused her for Lindsay Lohan

These students need to brush up on their 2000s pop culture history

‘It’s Hilary Duff, b**ches,” the Lizzie McGuire actress responded to a viral video of a group of students mistaking her for Lindsay Lohan.

While Hilary Duff is currently starring as Sophie in the spinoff series How I Met Your Father, the 34-year-old actor became a household name for her role on the Disney Channel’s Lizzie McGuire. However, these students seem to think she’s another 2000s child star.

In a video posted by @sarahulean on TikTok, which received over eight million views, a teacher promised her students a pizza party if they could ace this pop culture quiz. “Told my students if they tell me who these people are I would throw them a pizza party,” the original video said. The teacher displayed pictures of early 2000’s pop culture icons including Duff, and the young students were stumped. Although, they did throw out some good guesses.

“Lindsay Lohan!” one student shouted when an image of Duff from her Lizzie McGuire days appeared on the board. Another student suggested she was Debbie Ryan from Jessie.

The Younger actor reposted the video to her Instagram story on Thursday and responded with her own light-hearted message. “Although it’s Hilary Duff b**ches a.k.a. ‘Lizzie’,” she wrote on her Instagram story. “Live it, learn it.”

“Man am I happy to not have to be ‘good’ for the kids anymore,” she said, referring to her start on the Disney Channel. Duff was known for her roles in wholesome movies such as A Cinderella Story, Cadet Kelly, and The Lizzie McGuire Movie.

Duff wasn’t the only celebrity these kids didn’t recognise. The students mistook Miley Cyrus for JoJo Siwa, Ashley Tisdale for Hannah Montana, and Chris Brown for Michael Jackson.

Hilary Duff responds to students who confused her for Lindsay Lohan

In 2019, Duff announced that she will be reprising her role as Lizzie in a Lizzie McGuire reboot for Disney+. However, the plan was scrapped after she and Disney executives had conflicting ideas of how the character, whom she played as a teenager, would navigate life as an adult. “I was not really willing to bend, because of the age that Lizzie is, and they weren’t willing to bend, and we politely and lovingly paused,” Duff said in an interview with The New York Times. “It’s not dead. And it’s not alive. I’m always here to explore that character because it’s such a big part of me. You never know.”

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