Within moments of meeting people, you decide all sorts of things about them
Within moments of meeting people, you decide all sorts of things about them

How to make people like you in just four seconds

Here is how to become instantly likable

Shana Lebowitz
Friday 26 February 2016 15:39
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Within seconds of meeting you, people are already making judgments about your personality.

Those assessments can influence whether they want to hire you, date you, or be your friend.

So you'll want to do everything you can to make the best impression possible — before it's too late.

To help you out on that front, we checked out “How to Make People Like You in 90 Seconds or Less” by speaker and author Nicholas Boothman. The book highlights a key strategy for ingratiating yourself with your conversation partner while greeting them.

The best part? The whole process takes just four seconds. Read on to find out how to become instantly likable.

Step 1: Be open

It's equally important to cultivate a positive attitude.

Boothman says you'll want to open both your body and your attitude.

In terms of your body language, Boothman says you should aim your heart directly at the person you're meeting. Don't cover your heart with your hands or your arms. And if you're wearing a jacket, unbutton it beforehand.

It's equally important to cultivate a positive attitude. While you're greeting the person, Boothman says you should feel and be aware of that positivity.

Step 2: Make eye contact

Just make sure to look away at some point.

Boothman says you should be the one to initiate eye contact, and let your eyes reflect your positive attitude.

If you feel uncomfortable making eye contact, he suggests a strategy for getting used to it: When you're watching TV, note the eye color of the people on camera and say the name of the color in your head. The next day, do the same thing with every person you meet.

Just make sure to look away at some point — as Carol Kinsey Goman writes on Forbes, too much eye contact can feel rude or intimidating for the other person.

Smiling sends the message that you're sincere.

Step 3: Beam

Research also suggests that smiling when you meet someone in a happy context is a useful way to get them to remember you. 

Boothman advises being the first one to smile. You'll send the message that you're sincere.

Research also suggests that smiling when you meet someone in a happy context is a useful way to get them to remember you.

Step 4: Say “hello”

When the person you're meeting gives his or her name, try to repeat it a few times.

Whether you say “hi,” “hey,” or “hello,” or use another salutation, you should sound delighted to be making this person's acquaintance.

Next, you'll want to extend your hand. Make sure to give a firm handshake, which generally creates a more positive impression.

When the person you're meeting gives his or her name, try to repeat it a few times. For example, you might say, “Sara. Nice to meet you, Sara!”

If you're meeting multiple people and can't shake everyone's hand at once, Boothman says it's possible to conduct a “hands-free” handshake. Do everything you'd normally do while shaking someone's hand — point your heart in their direction, say hello, and smile — but don't extend your hand.

Step 5: Lean in

Boothman suggests an “almost imperceptible forward tilt” to show that you're open to and interested in what the person has to say.

There's no need to fall over into the person you're meeting.

Boothman suggests an “almost imperceptible forward tilt” to show that you're open to and interested in what the person has to say.

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Read the original article on Business Insider UK. © 2015. Follow Business Insider UK on Twitter.

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