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The worst interior design mishaps of the past 50 years revealed

Nothing says nostalgia quite like a beaded curtain

Sabrina Barr
Tuesday 12 June 2018 12:32
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British 'interior design crimes' revealed

Fashion has been nostalgic for the 1970s for the last few seasons, with tinted sunglasses, long floral dresses and straw handbags omnipresent on the high street and catwalks alike.

However, when it comes to interior design, the decade apparently fails to impress.

A new survey has revealed the worst interior design mishaps of the past 50 years, with furry toilet seat covers, beaded curtains and carpeted walls making the list as some of the greatest décor faux pas.

Interior design experts from Wallpaper, Ideal Home and House Beautiful magazines collated a shortlist of the most unstylish interior design trends of the past half-a-century.

The order of the list was then determined by 2,000 individuals who took part in the survey, which was commissioned by Samsung.

The 1970s was voted as being the least fashionable decade when it came to interior design by 38 per cent of the participants, followed by the 1980s, which took home 22 per cent of the votes.

Toilet rugs or furry toilet seat covers were voted as being the ultimate “home horror” by 44 per cent, with 39 per cent selecting taxidermy as their least favourite home furnishing.

A quarter of the participants expressed their dislike for waterbeds, while just under a fifth affirmed their aversion to any products designed with an animal print.

The research was commissioned by Samsung to mark the launch of its new QLED range.

The results have provided an illuminating insight into some of the most popular retro trends, such as avocado-coloured bathrooms and circular beds.

According to the study, some of the trends could have been influenced by TV shows such as Changing Rooms and Home Front that encouraged people to decorate their homes with rag-rolled walls and stencilling.

“I have lived through the 70s, 80s and 90s and seen interior design trends come and go and it’s fascinating how our tastes have evolved over time,” said Daniel Hopwood, president of the British Institute of Interior Design.

“Toilet rugs, rag rolled walls and TV cupboards should all be consigned to the dodgy décor history books.”

The list compiled by the survey has detailed a number of decorative trends that will likely not be making a comeback in the near future.

Here are the top 25 biggest décor mishaps of the past 50 years, as stated by the study:

  1. Toilet rugs/furry toilet seat covers – 44 per cent
  2. Taxidermy – 39 per cent
  3. Avocado bathrooms – 32 per cent
  4. Floral ‘chintz’ furniture – 28 per cent
  5. Waterbeds – 25 per cent
  6. Artex walls and ceilings – 25%
  7. Carpeted bathrooms – 25 per cent
  8. Rag rolled walls – 23 per cent
  9. Tribal carvings, masks and wall hangings – 23 per cent
  10. Stone cladding – 19 per cent
  11. Animal print anything - 19 per cent
  12. Inspirational quote art stenciled on the walls - 19 per cent
  13. Carpeted or textured walls - 19 per cent
  14. Beaded curtains - 19 per cent
  15. Living room bars - 19 per cent
  16. Bidets - 17 per cent
  17. Round beds - 17 per cent
  18. Professional family portraits - 15 per cent
  19. Shabby chic anything - 15 per cent
  20. Shag pile carpets - 14 per cent
  21. Wicker furniture indoors - 12 per cent
  22. Wallpaper borders - 12 per cent
  23. Curtain pelmets - 11 per cent
  24. TV cupboards - 11 per cent
  25. Stenciled walls or decals – 11 per cent

The survey also found that one in 10 Brits feel under pressure to redecorate their homes in order to impress house guests.

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