Kate Moss, Cara Delevingne and Rita Ora campaign to clean up the oceans

The initiative aims to increase the protection of the world's oceans from 2 per cent to 30 per cent by 2030

Joanna Whitehead
Wednesday 27 November 2019 16:26
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Kate Moss Cara Delevigne and more ask you to 'turn the tide on the climate crisis'

Kate Moss, Cara Delevingne and Rita Ora have joined forces in a new campaign to highlight the need to protect the oceans as part of the fight against the climate crisis.

Forming part of a star-studded line-up, which includes Pixie Geldof, Will Poulter and Poppy Delevingne, the celebrities have created a video emphasising how humanity needs to protect 30 per cent of the ocean in order to create a sustainable future for life on Earth.

Launched by Project Zero, a global initiative supported by scientists, business leaders and campaigners, that aims to raise awareness and galvanise support in maintaining “ecological equilibrium”, the film invites viewers to “turn the tide on the climate crisis”.

“On our entire planet, there isn’t one single thing more powerful than our ocean,” the film begins.

It goes on to inform the viewer that half of the world’s coral reefs have already died and that 60 per cent of fisheries have collapsed – “no wonder, with only two per cent of it being protected”.

The project aims to change this figure to 30 per cent by 2030.

As well as encouraging people to refrain from using plastic bottles and bags, the campaign has created an installation made entirely of recycled and reusable materials in London’s Carnaby Street which aims to increase awareness of the plight of our oceans.

Visitors can "Tap to Donate" £3 to Project Zero at locations throughout Carnaby, including JinJuu, Shakespeare’s Head Pub, White Horse Tavern and the Department of Coffee and Social Affairs.

In 2018, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned that we only have a decade to avoid the worst consequences of climate change.

Speaking at a UK parliamentary committee on climate change in July, Sir David Attenborough warned that “we cannot be radical enough in dealing with these issues”.

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