Lockdown could lead to a return to physical photos over digital, survey finds

More and more people are turning back to more traditional ways of displaying photographs 

<p>People look back on photos when they need cheering up</p>

People look back on photos when they need cheering up

Lockdown has led to a return to physical photos as people suffer from a digital burnout and become more sentimental about “the good times.”

A poll of 2,000 adults found that after spending so much time indoors this year, half have had enough of the digital life and are starting to appreciate physical items again.

As a result, many believe people are turning to real photos rather than their digital counterparts.

Of those, almost half think printed photos now have “more value” than digital ones while others put it down to the nation becoming more sentimental due to the pandemic.

And more than a quarterthink the novelty of displaying pictures online is wearing off.

A third think people want more reminders of their “pre-Covid" lives and the “good old days.”

The study, commissioned by Fujifilm, found 41 per cent believe the prolonged restrictions and lockdowns have further fuelled the print revival as people have spent more time sorting out and organising things, such as their photos.

It also emerged that people look back on old photos when they’re feeling unhappy, stressed or are looking for a way to cheer themselves up.

More than four in 10 felt their mood was boosted simply from looking at a physical photo, compared to just 12 per cent who said the same about digital images.

Psychologist Dr Emma Hepburn said: “Research suggests that recalling positive personal memories can help elicit positive emotion and engage reward-related neural circuitry, which can be beneficial for wellbeing.

“Having these memories in physical form, for example photographs around the house, can help create positive feelings on a daily basis when we see them."

This sentimental feeling has also spilled over into present choices this year, as people said lockdown has given them more time to plan their Christmas gifts and give something more meaningful than in previous years. 

One in five of the adults polled via Onepoll have put up more pictures in frames this year than they did before the pandemic.

Some have spent more time putting together photo albums to commemorate happier days.

Others want to see a return of physical books instead of e-readers, instant cameras over smart phones, phone books and physical tickets for sports or music events rather than the print-at-home or e-ticket options.

Neill Harris, a manager at Fujifilm said: “We’ve seen instant camera and printer sales soar over the past five years, and demand has risen rapidly as we've come through lockdown and into a very busy Christmas period.”

SWNS

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