Love Island’s Amber Davies sparks outrage with ‘rules’ on casual sex

‘This video is more damaging than casual sex’

Sabrina Barr@fabsab5
Thursday 05 April 2018 13:29
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Amber Davies explains why she had sex with Kem Cetinay on Love Island

Love Island winner Amber Davies has sparked outrage with her new proposed "rules" on casual sex.

During an appearance on BBC Radio 5 live as a co-host for yesterday’s recording, Davies decided to share her opinion on the significance of having casual sex.

While some may have assumed that she would hold open-minded views on the topic considering her stint on Love Island, Davies instead professed that she believes people should avoid having sex on the first date as a matter of "self-respect".

“Rule number one is no sex on the first date,” she said in a video. “If you don’t know the person, don’t have sex with the person, it’s all about self-respect.”

Davies continued, saying that people under the influence of alcohol should ask themselves: “Are you going to regret it in the morning?” before engaging in sexual activity.

For her third rule, she remarked that sex shouldn’t be used as a way of impressing other people, saying: “I think females and males would be a lot more impressed these days if you don’t put out on the first date.”

Davies went on to imply that women generally become more emotionally attached after sleeping with someone, which is why casual sex should be avoided in her eyes.

While some people on social media agreed with Davies’ views, others have expressed their extreme disapproval over the message that she’s spreading.

“This video is more damaging than casual sex,” one critic wrote. “Here’s a message to young women, as long as it’s consensual and you’re happy, have as much casual sex as you want!

“It absolutely doesn’t equate to how much self-respect you have.”

“I don’t like how she’s implying that you don’t respect yourself if you want to have casual sex,” another person commented.

“Also, the essentialism in ‘we know women get attached’ is distasteful. I don’t like what I choose to do, which doesn’t hurt anyone, being dissected and labelled good and bad.”

One Twitter user described the implication that women can be more emotionally vulnerable than men as “bordering on misogynistic”.

Davies has responded to the criticism on Twitter, writing: “Guys there is no wrong or right answer to casual sex.

“I am glad I had the opportunity to discuss this, and I’ve learnt a lot and it was great to hear people’s views and opinions!

“The rules are personal to me and I appreciate everyone is different.

“We spoke about losing virginity and using sex as some form of revenge it’s a lot deeper than just discussing casual sex."

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