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Women more likely to cheat on partners between six and 10 years of marriage, finds study

The seven-year itch is more than just a theory

Olivia Petter
Wednesday 08 November 2017 13:11 GMT
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(Picture: Antonio Guillem/iStock/Getty Images)

Scientists have identified a specific window in which women, who are in long term relationships, are most likely to cheat on their partners.

They found that women are more inclined to commit adultery between six and 10 years of being with someone.

However, when it came to examining male infidelity rates, the study found that the window was less specific, with men most likely to cheat after 11 years.

Researchers conducted two separate studies which looked at 423 participants, each of whom was asked to complete a survey on the perceived importance of resisting temptations towards infidelity.

They were also asked to state the likelihood that they would cheat on their partner given the opportunity.

The study, which was published in The Journal of Sex Research, concluded that multiple factors led people to refrain from committing adultery, but more commonly these related to a desire to maintain moral standards and a fear of being alone.

Their findings with regards to female infidelity prove ideas perpetuated by the seven-year itch theory, an infamous psychological term which suggests that relationships start to dwindle after seven years.

It's a trend that's historically been thought to have been supported by divorce statistics, which show that many couples separate around this period of time.

However, according to recent figures published by the Office for National Statistics, the median duration of marriages ending in divorce in the UK fluctuate between 8.9 and 12.2 years.

While the data might extend beyond the demonised seventh year, it covers part of the period cited by the study with regards to women and therefore makes sense as they are more likely to cheat during these years.

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