People think Meghan Markle is now speaking with a British accent

The Duchess of Sussex appears to have adopted the new accent after her wedding

Meghan Markle speaking with a British accent

Just two months after her royal wedding, Meghan Markle appears to have adopted a British accent to go along with her new title.

The Duchess of Sussex was greeting fans during an outing in Cheshire with Queen Elizabeth in June when the new accent was noticed as Markle exchanged pleasantries.

In the video, the 36-year-old California-native can be heard introducing herself and discussing the weather with the adoring crowd in what seems to be a British lilt - and it wasn’t long before the viral video divided the internet.

Although Markle’s speech has been analysed before due to the hint of an accent, the new, more pronounced accent saw some people criticising the former actress, who now resides in England full-time.

“I’m kind of disappointed. It seems unauthentic for Meghan Markle to be speaking with a British accent. Especially this fast. It makes it seem like something was wrong with the way she sounded before,” one person suggested.

Another said: “Unreasonably sad about Meghan Markle adopting an English accent and inflexions. We’ve officially lost her to the monarchy.”​

However, many others defended the American-born royal - and pointed out the Duchess of Sussex is likely to pick up a slight accent after being surrounded by it for close to a year now.

“Accents are NOT biological, they’re cultural and they’re something you can pick up anywhere you go if you’re entrenched deeply enough,” one person said on Twitter, defending the Duchess.

Others suggested that the accent could be a relic of her acting days - as an actress, Markle likely had to adopt other accents and ways of speaking.

However, whether Markle has noticed her new accent or not, experts agree that it is completely normal to pick up an accent depending on who you surround yourself with - as it is a subconscious way of adapting to one’s surroundings.

“Subconsciously, you always have the impulse to adapt to your surroundings, wherever you are. So in London, you've adapted the way you speak to a lowest common denominator accent – in other words, you've learned to speak without any regional peculiarities at all that would make you difficult to understand. When you go home, you take yourself out of the professional milieu and back to friends and family members who know you well. You relax because there isn't that constraint of needing to be understood,” linguistics expert Dr Damien Hall told Esquire.

As the Duchess of Sussex adjusts to her role as a member of the British royal family, the new accent is just one example of Markle’s dedication to her new life.

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