Timeless classic: How to turn a Ford Mustang into a watch

‘Most people would just see a pile of metal, a ghost of a Mustang. We see something completely different – the soul of a car and a story that needs to be told’

A watch made out of fragments of an old car?

Yes, and an attractive one too, perhaps a way to keep a link with an expired but much loved old favourite? Or just because you like the idea…

The idea is the brainchild of Christian Mygh and Jonathan Kamstrup, who together scour salvage yards around the world for models, each of which can be transformed into hundreds of unique timepieces, costing from $1,495 (about £1,250). The firm, REC Watches, based in Denmark, markets a range of automotive-themed timepices.

The P51-01, for example, is handcrafted from salvaged and recycled classic 1960s Ford Mustangs. Each dial features the unique VIN (Vehicle Identification Number) and year of the salvaged car that was used to make the watch. The design of the battery “power reserve” is inspired by the fuel gauge of the classic Ford Mustang, while the three-hand and date functions are inspired by the original Mustang dashboard.

For the true Mustang enthusiast, REC will even create an entirely new watch from parts donated by customers, including World Champion Drifter and professional fun-haver Vaughn Gittin Jr, who wears a watch that includes carbon fibre bodywork from his 700 horsepower World Drift Series Ford Mustang RTR.

“Most people would just see a pile of metal, a ghost of a Mustang. We see something completely different – the soul of a car and a story that needs to be told,” said co-founder Mygh. “I’m not cutting up Mustangs. I’m bringing Mustangs that are beyond repair back to life as a watch.”

To ensure these stories continue to be told, REC Watches painstakingly trace the history of each vehicle; talking to previous owners, collecting stories and images from the car’s past lives, and incorporating them into a bespoke video.

On one trip to Sweden, the team struck gold with a rare 1966 Raven Black model that has become the basis for their limited-edition P51-04 collection of 250 watches.

Named after a World War II fighter plane and launched in 1964, the Ford Mustang’s radical styling and aggressive performance made it an instant classic. Its superstar status was cemented by a starring role in the 1968 Steve McQueen action movie Bullitt, as well as a string of songs and films focused on or incorporating the groundbreaking car. The modern-day Ford Mustang keeps the excitement alive with exhilarating high-performance from the 450 PS 5.0-litre V8 engine and the 290 PS 2.3-litre EcoBoost unit.

By the way, REC have also turned an old Mustang into a barbecue, but we understand there’s no horse meat on this grill.

For more motoring views visit freecarmag.com; watchshop.com

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