The campaign affirms New Yorker's right to live, work, and pray free from discrimination and harassment
The campaign affirms New Yorker's right to live, work, and pray free from discrimination and harassment

New York launches campaign to tackle racial discrimination under Trump’s presidency

It follows a 60 per cent rise in reports of discrimination in 2016, a trend that continues into 2017

Sarah Young@sarah_j_young
Tuesday 30 May 2017 09:40
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With reports of discrimination hitting an all-time high in New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio and the NYC Commission on Human Rights have joined forces to launch a campaign that encourages inclusivity.

Following a significant increase in reports of bias incidents – particularly since last year’s election – the campaign looks to affirm New Yorker’s right to live, work and pray free from discrimination and harassment.

Regardless of what happens at federal level, the commission’s chair, Carmelyn P. Malalis told BuzzFeed News that the campaign says “the city of New York will stand up for you.”

“For this campaign we were thinking broadly of xenophobia,” she explained.

“So much of the rhetoric in the last election cycle, and what continues, is what I would consider to be anti-immigrant — really hateful against people because of where they come from and the languages they speak.”

The $468,000 ad campaign will feature more than 2,000 placards on subways, ads in newspapers and community events in a bit to counter bias crimes.

The campaign follows a significant increase in reports of discrimination

Featuring various people, the ads lay out the rights of minorities under the NYC Human Rights Law and encourage victims to report incidents to the city.

In one of the ads, a Muslim woman says, “I should have the right to wear what my faith calls for, without being called a threat.”

The campaign insists that every New Yorker has the right to live free from discrimination and harassment

In another a man says, “I should have the right to speak to my kids in Spanish, without someone telling me to speak English.”

According to the commission, there was a 60 per cent increase in overall reports of discrimination in 2016 with complaints already up another 30 per cent so far this year.

The ads lay out the rights of minorities under the NYC Human Rights Law

What’s more, those involving a person’s race, religion, national origin and immigration status rose by a shocking 30 per cent.

A trend that continues into 2017, the city is determined to stand up for the diversity of its citizens and protect people against discrimination and harassment.

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