A third of people prefer to never know someone’s name than ask them to repeat it, poll claims

‘It’s better to build up the courage and go against your natural instinct to be polite’

Potentially millions of Britons would rather not know someone's name than ask them to repeat it, a poll suggests
Potentially millions of Britons would rather not know someone's name than ask them to repeat it, a poll suggests

More than a third of people surveyed for a new poll would prefer to never know someone’s name than ask them to repeat it again.

Of the 2,000 adults questioned, almost a fifth considered themselves “too polite” to ask someone a question more than once.

Around 35 per cent felt it rude to ask for instructions to be repeated and 23 per cent claimed to be too respectful of others to ask for a favour.

A third of those polled admitting they are rarely able to follow orders and commands fully if given only once.

“As a nation, it’s almost second nature to be polite, and asking someone to repeat themselves can come across as rude – even when we really need a reminder,” said Chris Logan, managing director of Crystal Ski Holidays, which commissioned the survey. “But our study found this lack of confidence can have a real negative impact on our personal growth and development.

“In fact, it’s something that can stop people learning new skills ... as Brits can be too embarrassed to admit they don’t understand or can’t follow instructions. Sometimes it’s better to build up the courage and go against your natural instinct to be polite.

“It could end up so much worse – and possibly even more embarrassing – by making a mistake because you were too afraid to ask.”

Nearly half of those polled viewed politeness is a typically British trait, along with apologising profusely, and a willingness to queue for hours on end.

Support free-thinking journalism and attend Independent events

Sarcasm, a stiff upper lip and avoiding sitting next to someone on public transport at all costs also featured among the list of perceived classic British attributes.

Three quarters would describe themselves as “typically British”, and rated their politeness a 7.5 out of 10, on average.

However, one in 10 reckon their British ways have been a hindrance to their life so far, as they are unable to reach out and ask for help.

SWNS

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in