Prince Charles says Lilibet Diana’s birth is ‘such happy news’ following royal rift

The Prince of Wales made the comments during a visit in Oxford

<p>Prince of Wales,  makes a speech on th production line to employees during his visit to the MINI plant in Oxford </p>

Prince of Wales, makes a speech on th production line to employees during his visit to the MINI plant in Oxford

Prince Charles has expressed his delight at becoming a grandfather for the fifth time, describing baby Lilibet’s birth as “such happy news”.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle welcomed their second child, a daughter named Lilibet “Lili” Diana Mountbatten-Windsor on Friday 4 June in Santa Barbara, California. 

Since the announcement of her birth, royal family members including the Queen, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, the Duchess of Cornwall and Prince Charles have all released messages of congratulations.

During a visit to the Oxford Mini UK Plant on Tuesday Prince Charles spoke about the importance of maintaining a healthy world for future generations, especially since he became a grandfather again.

“The development of technology like electric vehicles, or green hydrogen for that matter for heavy transport, is vital for maintaining the health of our world for future generations, something I’m only too aware of today having recently become a grandfather for the fifth time,” he said.

Commenting on Lilibet’s arrival he said: “And such happy news really does remind one of the necessity of continued innovation in this area, especially around sustainable battery technology, in view of the legacy we bequeath to our grandchildren.”

He also made reference to his father, Prince Philip, and his use of electric vehicles throughout his later life.

The Prince of Wales comments come after Harry hinted at a strained relationship with his father during an interview with Oprah Winfrey in March.

The Duke of Sussex said he felt “really let down” by his father, who he claimed stopped taking his calls after Meghan and Harry stepped down as senior members of the royal family and moved out of the UK with their son Archie. 

“He knows what pain feels like, and Archie’s his grandson, but at the same time, I of course, I will always love him. I think there’s a lot of hurt that’s happened, and I will continue to make it one of my priorities to try and heal that relationship,” Harry told Winfrey.

In his new documentary series, The Me You Can’t See, Harry gave viewers another insight into his upbringing as a royal.

During a conversation with Sanja Oakley, a therapist specialising in EDMR trauma therapy, Harry described conversations between him and his father when he was struggling emotionally.

“My father used to say to me when I was younger, he used to say to both William and I ‘Well it was like that for me so it’s gonna be like that for you’.”

He continued: “That doesn’t make sense. Just because you suffered, that doesn’t mean that your kids have to suffer. In fact quite the opposite.

“If you’ve suffered, do whatever you can to make sure that whatever experiences, negative experiences you had, that you can make it right for your kids.”

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