Prince Charles expresses ‘warmest appreciation for resilience and fortitude’ of hospitality workers

‘Hospitality connects people and enables them to create wonderful memories,’ royal says as businesses reopen in England

Prince Charles pays tribute to hospitality sector

The Prince of Wales has expressed his admiration for hospitality workers as businesses reopen, stating his hope that the “entrepreneurial spirit” of the sector will ensure a “brighter” future.

From Saturday 4 July, establishments including restaurants, pubs and hotels in England are allowed to open their doors to the public once more as part of the government’s latest easing of lockdown measures.

The businesses will have to comply with certain guidelines to ensure the safety of customers and staff members is being prioritised, such as only offering a table service for diners.

In light of the reopening of hospitality companies, Prince Charles issued a statement of support, saying it is “exceptionally welcome news that hotels, restaurants and pubs are to begin opening their doors”.

“Hospitality connects people and enables them to create wonderful memories with families and friends, be it over a pint of beer, a special meal with family or an overnight stay to explore new places. All these experiences have been dearly missed as normal life has been put on hold,” the heir apparent said.

“I know that those at the forefront of hospitality have missed their guests too, so I can only express my warmest appreciation for the resilience and fortitude shown by those in hospitality and offer my deepest sympathy to those who are struggling to keep their businesses going or are having to cope with the appalling misery of seeing their businesses go into administration.”

The 71-year-old added his hope that the reopening of the hospitality industry will help businesses flourish in the near future.

“I only pray we can begin to rebuild a vital and resilient industry and that the wonderful entrepreneurial spirit I come across so often can help secure brighter and much more sustainable times ahead,” he said.

Prince Charles also spoke about staff at his Prince’s Foundation, where nearly 200 workers were furloughed during the pandemic.

The royal explained that Dumfries House, a country estate in Scotland that he saved in 2007, and Highgrove, his private residence in Gloucestershire, regularly welcome thousands of visitors.

“I know full well from the enforced closure of properties run by my Foundation, both in Aberdeenshire and East Ayrshire, let alone the complete disruption of all charitable enterprises at Highgrove, just how far reaching the effects of the lack of trading can be,” he said.

In late June, while taking part in BBC Radio 4’s Rethink project, Prince Charles delivered two spoken essays about how the world may change following the Covid-19 crisis.

The royal referenced how food shortages have prompted people to think more about sustainability when consuming and producing food.

“Food availability was clearly an early issue; perhaps food shortages prompted many people to think for the very first time about whether they could depend on secure and reliable supplies of food in the post-Covid world?” he said.

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