Sprouts and toilet roll among the weirdest secret Secret Santa gifts

Chocolates, socks and extra-hot chilli sauce among top presents 

The perfect secret Santa gift

A bag of brussel sprouts, novelty toilet roll and a Simon Cowell mask were among the strangest secret Santa gifts received by people polled for a new survey.

A T-shirt with a work friend's face on it, an inflatable turkey and a "grow your own boyfriend" kit, were also among some of the oddest gifts given to to the 2,000 UK adults questioned.

Alcohol was the most popular present followed by chocolate and gift cards. Sweets, socks, perfume and toiletries featured too, along with photo frames, flowers and make-up.

“Taking part in secret Santa is an age-old tradition and great way to express your creative or humorous side, but it also allows you to be thoughtful and sentimental," said Julie Fever of high street chain Wilko, which commissioned the research. “It’s a great way to bond with colleagues and friends, whether new or existing, and whether you are purchasing an item that stands as a long-running joke between pals, or a lovely gift for a more distant colleague.

“If you don’t know your secret Santa well, it’s always worth taking the time to get to know them and doing a little research. Don’t get gifts that are too cheeky or risque if you want to avoid embarrassment, but a bit of humour never goes amiss.”

The poll also found one in 10 saw a secret Santa as a chance to be "mischievous" and get someone something a bit unexpected.

More than half of the survey's respondents said they would find it funny if they were to receive a risqué gift.

However, one in 10 said they have been given items in the past that were "inappropriate" or "insulting".

The research also found one in five would hate to have to buy or receive a gift from their boss in secret Santa.

And one in seven would not like to have to buy something for a colleague they don’t get on with.

But the survey found that 25 per cent have had to buy for a person they don’t like - and a fifth have even swapped who they chose for secret Santa as a result.

One in seven said they are so worried they’ll receive a bad gift this year, they’ve told others what they want to avoid disappointment.

The research found that workers in Northern Ireland spend the the most on their colleagues for Secret Santa, with gifts costing on average £17.36, while those in the south west only spend £8.54.

SWNS

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