Selena Gomez says it was ‘freeing’ to be diagnosed as bipolar

‘I really want people to be understood and seen and heard. It’s okay to not be okay’

<p>The actor and singer says she wants people to be understood, seen and heard </p>

The actor and singer says she wants people to be understood, seen and heard

Actor and singer Selena Gomez has shared that she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, but is happier than she’s ever been.

The star has frequently spoken about navigating her mental health, and is set to launch a multimedia wellness company called Wondermind, with her mother Mandy Teefey and businesswoman Daniella Pierson.

When speaking on Good Morning America to promote the platform, which will allow anyone to work on their “mental fitness”, she said: “It was really freeing to have the information [of being diagnosed with bipolar disorder].”

“It made me really happy because I started to have a relationship with myself, and I think that’s the best part. Like, I’ve probably been the happiest I’ve ever been.”

Gomez revealed that for years she was concerned about her mental health, but only recently has figured out what’s really happening, with the help of her mum - who has ADHD - and mental health professionals.

She said: “I can’t believe I am where I am mentally, just because of how I took the necessary steps in order to kind of remove myself from that because it’s just not normal. I really want people to be understood and seen and heard. It’s okay to not be okay.”

Speaking to Instyle in January, she spoke of how Instagram became her “whole world” and was “dangerous”.

The 29-year-old has more than 310 million Instagram followers, making her one of the most-followed profiles.

She’s also previously talked about feeling insecure about her physical appearance, especially in her early 20s, and being constantly blighted by “unnecessary hate and comparisons”.

When featuring on Good Morning America, she also revealed how she has not used Instagram, or the internet in general, in four-and-a-half years, in a radical lifestyle overhaul.

Gomez said: “It has changed my life completely. I am happier, I am more present, I connect more with people. It makes me feel normal.”

Instead, she hires a team of people to run her accounts, and now her new mental health platform is intended to help those won’t can’t access therapy themselves.

She acknowledged that “[mental health resources] cost ridiculous amounts of money”, before adding: “But [like with] Planned Parenthood, there’s a place for women to feel okay and to feel understood, and I want that for mental health.

“I think it’s so important and I can’t stress it enough how much I care and how much I really, really want people to be understood, seen and heard.”

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in