Queer Eye's Tan France says he understands why people choose fast fashion

The fashion expert also gives advice on how to shop more sustainably

Tan France explains why he doesn't criticise fast fashion

Tan France has revealed the reason he doesn’t criticise people who buy from fast fashion brands.

Before his appearance on Netflix TV series Queer Eye, France studied fashion at Doncaster College, going on to open his own clothing company and work for a number of different retailers including high street stalwart Zara.

But, with the conversation around sustainability louder than ever before, what does the Queer Eye expert really think about fast fashion?

Speaking to BBC Radio 5 Live, France revealed that, although he works in an industry associated with fast fashion – inexpensive clothing produced rapidly by mass-market retailers in response to current trends – he doesn’t believe in the concept of wearing something just once.

“I’m in an industry where you would assume I would only wear something once and not wear it again because I’ve already posted about it. I don’t,” he told radio host Laura Whitmore.

“If I love something I wear it a lot, I spend my money on things that I know are going to be classic and I can wear at least for the next few years.”

Despite this, France admitted he doesn’t judge people who wear lower priced clothes.

“Fast fashion, I don’t knock it because I remember being poor and not being able to afford a look that David Beckham was wearing so I would get a cheap version of it somewhere else,” he explained.

“I would get the look for a lot less because that was the only option available to me so I don’t knock anybody who is going to a fast fashion retailer.”

The 35-year-old also gave his tips for dressing in a sustainable way on a budget, calling for people to educate themselves on what is a false economy.

“I would try and encourage people to be more selective with what they’re purchasing and not be as wasteful,” he said.

“I think it’s a false economy to buy, let’s say for example, five pairs of black jeans from a really low price retailer, that’s not going to last as long, they’re going to last a couple of months each.

“Whereas if you just saved that money and spent your money on one pair of black jeans that are better quality, they’re going to last you longer in the long run.

“I think people need better education on what’s a false economy.”

France returns to the small screen with the third season of Queer Eye on 15 March.

The reality show follows the “Fab Five”, food and wine expert Antoni Porowski, grooming expert Jonathan Van Ness, fashion expert Tan France, design expert Bobby Berk and culture expert Karamo Brown, as they transform individuals lives.

Netflix has announced that the Queer Eye team are also flying to Asia to “work with local tastemakers to make-better a new group of heroes” while sampling the local culture.

The episodes, titled Queer Eye: We’re in Japan!, will be available on the streaming service following the third season.

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