Tony Hawk shares video of the moment his daughter overcame her fear of skateboarding

'I might have been more nervous than she was'

Sarah Young
Monday 25 February 2019 00:38
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Tony Hawk captures the moment his daughter overcame her fear of skateboarding

Tony Hawk has shared a video of the moment he helped his daughter overcome her fear of skateboarding.

Posting the video on Twitter and Instagram the 50-year-old wrote: “My daughter overcoming her fear in real time (wait for it).

“I might have been more nervous than she was.”

The 57-second clip shows the professional skateboarder’s 10-year-old daughter, Kadence, balancing on the edge of a half-pipe, wearing knee pads and a helmet.

Hawk can be heard advising Kadence to “lean forward”, adding: “Don't lean towards me, go straight. That's the key - don't come toward me, go that way.”

He then moves towards her, holding her hand while she steadies herself before she finally takes the leap.

The video has since received more than eight million views and been flooded with comments from fans praising the 10-year-old for being so brave.

“So awesome to see her overcome her fear there and take that first step (and not fall face first like I would),” one person wrote.

Another added: “HELL YEAH YOU GO GIRL!! I'm 27 and I am too scared to do this lmfao she's hardcore.”

The heartwarming video prompted others to share their own experiences of being a beginner and teaching their own children to skate.

“So awesome. My daughter just started little drop ins... could use a better teacher though,” one person wrote.

Another commented: “Probably the most difficult and crucial thing of parenting: avoiding to transmit our fears and help them overcome their own.”

A third added: “You never ever forget the first time you drop in. EVER!!! Any skater knows what she felt."

Hawk is widely regarded as one of the greatest skateboarders of all time.

He won 10 gold medals at the Summer X Games and in 2009 was inducted into the Skateboarding Hall of Fame at its inaugural ceremony.

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