A growing number of gynaecologists are warning that this bizarre new trend could lead to a dangerous infection
A growing number of gynaecologists are warning that this bizarre new trend could lead to a dangerous infection

Doctors warn against new trend of women putting glitter in their vagina

'Using this so-called Passion Dust might actually kill off any passion at all'

Sarah Young
Thursday 27 July 2017 16:55
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Gynaecologists are warning against a bizarre new trend which sees women inserting glitter-filled capsules into their vaginas, concerned that it could have potentially dangerous side effects.

An online retailer is selling controversial capsules designed to glitter-bomb your bits, proving that the unicorn trend has officially peaked.

Essentially created to make your vagina look and taste better – because they’re clearly not fine just as they are - the Pretty Woman Inc website says that the capsules “just enough to make your lover feel that your Yara (water-lady or little butterfly) is what all vaginas are supposed to look, feel and taste like; soft, sweet and magical!"

According to the site they sold out of the 'Passion Dust intimacy capsules' in a matter of days.

But, a growing number of gynaecologists are warning that this bizarre new trend could actually lead to a dangerous infection.

"The vagina contains a delicate balance of good bacteria, which are there to protect it," Dr Vanessa Mackay, spokesperson for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) told The Independent.

"If women place foreign objects inside their vagina, they risk disturbing this balance which may lead to infection, such as bacterial vaginosis or thrush, and inflammation."

Consultant obstetrician and gynaecologist Shazia Malik agreed, saying that the ingredients used in these capsules could cause painful inflammatory discharge and even tiny scratches to the vagina.

"Using a product like this so called passion dust might actually kill off any passion at all," she told The Independent.

"The starch and gelatin will increase the pH as well as adding sugar to vaginal secretions - which will encourage harmful bacteria and fungi such as Candida to thrive.

"This causes increased discharge and a painful inflamed vagina, which causes painful intercourse.

"Also the glitter capsules can cause tiny scratches to the vaginal mucosa during sex, again allowing harmful bacteria to infect the vaginal walls. Even worse it's possible that some glitter pieces may even migrate up through the cervix in to the womb lining and have exactly the same effects there.”

However, Passion Dust’s retailer’s pre-empted the backlash by adding a section to its site urging their readers to ignore expert advice.

"Any gynaecologist would tell you that NOTHING should go in your vagina!" the site says.

"If you've ever had vaginal issues you had them before you used Passion Dust anyway. If you've ever had a yeast infection I'm sure it wasn't caused by glitter, it just happens sometimes."

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