Wuhan shake: People in China developing new ways to greet each other amid coronavirus fears

Foot-to-foot greeting comes as health officials discourage close contact around globe

Chelsea Ritschel
Monday 02 March 2020 22:51
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'Wuhan Shake' greeting goes viral amid coronavirus fears

A new hands-free greeting has gone viral on social media amid fears over the new coronavirus.

A video of the “Wuhan shake,” named for the city in China where the virus originated, was first shared on social media last week.

In the clip, a man wearing a face mask greets his friends by tapping his feet against theirs.

“People in China found another way to greet since they can’t shake hands,” the video is captioned. “The Wuhan shake. I love how people can adapt and keep a sense of humour about stressful situations.”

The video, which has since been viewed more than 34,000 times, has been met with support for the ingenuity.

“Actually that is awesome,” one person commented, while another said: “That’s a great idea and you don’t need hand sanitiser.”

The alternative greeting comes after public health officials have warned people to stop kissing or shaking hands amid fears over the spread of new coronavirus.

In Switzerland, where it is common to greet people with kisses on both cheeks, health minister Alain Berset advised against the greeting, telling SonntagsZeitung newspaper: “We know that keeping one’s distance socially is the best way to slow the spread of the virus. That is why renouncing greeting kisses is a measure that should be seriously taken into consideration.”

As new coronavirus continues to infect people around the globe, Dr Sylvie Briand, director of the Department of Pandemic and Epidemic diseases at the World Health Organisation (WHO), also encouraged other means of greeting people.

People are greeting each other with their feet (Twitter)

Sharing a cartoon of “handshake alternatives,” Dr Briand wrote: “We need to adapt to this new disease.”

In addition to avoiding contact with people who may be sick, health organisations recommend following cleanliness practises such as thoroughly washing your hands, covering your mouth when you cough, and avoiding touching your nose, eyes or mouth.

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