Fraudsters are using "number spoofing" to fool people into revealing their passwords

Criminals clone the phone number of the organisation they want to impersonate so it appears on the victim's caller ID display

Emma Lunn
Saturday 01 November 2014 01:00
Comments

Criminals are using a new scam to make people believe they are speaking to a trusted organisation – like a bank – by fooling their phones into displaying any number the fraudster chooses.

Known as "number spoofing", it works by fraudsters cloning the phone number of the organisation they want to impersonate so it appears on the victim's caller ID display when they phone them.

The criminal will then draw their attention to the number, claiming this is proof of identity. Once they have their victim's confidence they will try to extract information such as a PIN or online passwords and use these to steal from their account.

Never assume someone is who they say they are just because their number matches that of an organisation you know. In fact, if someone tries to draw your attention to the number on your caller ID display, you should immediately become suspicious.

Similarly, you should be suspicious if you're asked for your four-digit PIN, your full online-banking passwords, to transfer or withdraw money, or to give your card to a courier. Your bank or the police will never ask you to do any of these things.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in