3 impressive questions you should ask at the very beginning of a job interview

Jacquelyn Smith
Wednesday 29 June 2016 17:01
Comments
Job interviews can be very nervous affairs, but if you prep yourself properly you should have all the ammunition to take them on
Job interviews can be very nervous affairs, but if you prep yourself properly you should have all the ammunition to take them on

The job interview is a two-way street.

You should be assessing the employer just as much as they're assessing you because you both need to walk away convinced that the job would be a great fit ... and that should start from the moment you take the hot seat.

At the very end of the interview, the hiring manager usually asks, "Do you have any questions for me?" But don't wait until they turn the tables to start asking questions.

Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of "Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job," says that there are a few you should ask at the very beginning of the conversation.

Here are three of them, along with her reasons for asking these early on:

'How did this position develop?'

This is a good conversation starter on your end, says Taylor:

"It demonstrates intellectual curiosity, yet isn't intrusive or brash. It's also helpful to let the hiring manager talk, as you gather some history on the position. You'll get some insight on whether the opening is due to turnover or growth, for example."

'How does this role fit into the larger objectives of the department and company?'

Try to ascertain the big picture in the early stages of the interview, suggests Taylor.

"This will help you better frame your answers in a way that's more meaningful. It's easier to sell your skills when you can relate them to the company's larger strategy," she says.

'What do you like most about working here?'

This is a friendly, nonthreatening question that works early on because it's conversational, and you're showing interest in the interviewer.

She says:

"It can also be received as flattering, but at the same time, you're getting to know the hiring manager.

"Are they thrilled about mentoring their staff, their product or service, the innovative atmosphere? Do they focus on only growth numbers and minimizing expenses, with no mention of the team, training, or growth opportunities? It gives you a sneak preview into your prospective manager's priorities and all-important personality. This is where it pays to have your people radar up, to evaluate if this is a boss you can respect."

Read more:

• Analysts question the way Apple describes its data
• Mike Ashley has a plan to save BHS with no job losses
• Investors think central banks have lost their power

Read the original article on Business Insider UK. © 2016. Follow Business Insider UK on Twitter.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in