Hairdressing and beauty services most accident prone industry

A fifth of employees injured at work reported suffering sprains 

Mollie Goodfellow
Friday 23 October 2015 11:51
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Hairdressing was found to be the most accident prone career
Hairdressing was found to be the most accident prone career

Hairdressers and beauticians are the most likely to suffer an accident at work, a new survey reveals.

Health and safety data obtained by comparison site Confused.com found electricians and plumbers were the second most injured career behind the beauty industry.

However, construction was the most dangerous profession, accounting for a third of workplace deaths.

The most common workplace injury involved workers cutting themselves accounting for two fifths of injuries. A fifth of employees reported sprains as a common injury and a tenth of those injured at work had suffered a broken bone.Read more

More specific mishaps that were flagged by the survey, workers reported being run over by forklifts, stapling their own thumb and being assaulted by an offender during an arrest.

Police officers were considered to have the third most accident-prone job.

Top three accident prone careers

1. Hairdressing and beauticians

2. Electricians and plumbers

3. Police officers

Top five most dangerous industries

1. Construction

2. Shops and restaurants

3. Banking

4. Transport

5. Agriculture

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