Asda to allow office staff to work from home permanently if they choose

Supermarket giant will allow workers to be based at home, in office or in store

Lamiat Sabin
Friday 02 July 2021 14:06
Comments
<p>Hybrid working will be made permanent for Asda head office employees</p>

Hybrid working will be made permanent for Asda head office employees

Asda will make “hybrid” working permanent for employees at its head offices once Covid rules are relaxed.

The supermarket has announced that about 4,000 staff in total, at Asda House in Leeds and at George House in Leicester, can choose where they work best – whether at home, or at the office, shop or depot.

England is set to lift its remaining coronavirus restrictions on 19 July, and many businesses have indicated that they will continue to allow flexible working after this date.

However, Jacki Simpson, Asda’s vice president of people operations, said the hybrid model would not work for all employees, such as those who work in training and need to have in-person contact with colleagues.

Earlier this week, Labour MP and shadow children’s minister Tulip Siddiq read out the Flexible Working Bill in parliament, and said flexible working ought to be a “right for all rather than a perk for the few”.

The legislation she introduced through the ten-minute rule is backed by MPs from the Labour, Conservative, Lib Dem, SNP, SDLP and Green parties. It is scheduled to have its second reading on 19 November.

It came after Downing Street had confirmed that the government was considering legislating to make working from home the “default” option by giving employees the right to request it.

However, prime minister Boris Johnson’s official spokesperson said there would be no legal right to work from home.

They added that Mr Johnson believed there were benefits to being in the office, including collaboration with colleagues.

The PM’s position echoes the concerns of the largest business lobby group, the Confederation of British Industry (CBI), which has warned that giving workers the legal right to demand remote working would harm young employees and damage city centre economies.

Major banks including Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley have taken the most hardline stance on post-lockdown working, by demanding that all staff return to the office once Covid restrictions are lifted.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in