Ivanka Trump: Chinese companies rush to secure US President's daughter's name for consumer products

At least 65 companies, ranging from alcohol retailers to wallpaper companies, have applied to use the name ‘Ivanka’ as their trademark, According to the South China Morning Post

Josie Co
Business Editor
Monday 20 February 2017 13:18
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According to the South China Morning Post, at least 65 companies, ranging from alcohol retailers to wallpaper companies, have applied to use the name ‘Ivanka’ as their trademark
According to the South China Morning Post, at least 65 companies, ranging from alcohol retailers to wallpaper companies, have applied to use the name ‘Ivanka’ as their trademark

Chinese companies are going crazy for Ivanka.

According to the South China Morning Post, at least 65 companies, ranging from alcohol retailers to wallpaper companies, have applied to use the name ‘Ivanka’ as their trademark, in a nod to the daughter of US President Donald Trump.

The paper reports that a Beijing-based company that provides weight loss services filed 10 applications to use ‘Ivanka’, on products including cosmetics and nutritional supplements, according to information released on the website of the Trademark Office of the State Administration for Industry & Commerce.

Separately, Fujian Yingjie Commodity Company filed an application to use Ivanka for its brand of sanitary napkins a week after Mr Trump won the US presidential election.

The South China Morning Post said that most of the applications are still being processed and it is not known whether any of them will be granted trademark rights.

Ivanka Trump made headlines earlier this month when high-end retailer Nordstrom announced that it had decided to cut ties with her line of clothing and accessories, citing declining sales.

Mr Trump responded with a series of tweets in which he accused the chain of having acted “unfairly” and White House spokesman Sean Spicer characterised the retailer’s move as a “direct attack” on the President’s policies.

Ms Trump’s popularity has risen in China since she visited the Chinese embassy in Washington during the lunar New Year, according to The South China Morning Post.

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