The UK's best companies to work for revealed

Companies featured in the top 20 workplace cultures have unorthodox management styles 

Shafi Musaddique
Thursday 19 October 2017 11:55
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Businesses with flat hierarchies doing away with traditional management topped the list
Businesses with flat hierarchies doing away with traditional management topped the list

Northern Gas and Power has been voted the company with the best workplace culture in the UK, topping a list dominated by tech firms.

The energy consultant ranked number one for its focus on management behaviour and a track record of promoting employees, according to the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and recruitment website Glassdoor.

Tech firm Fourth, which specialises in software for the hospitality industry, came second in the UK. It used a so-called “split” management style, where leaders are divided into technical specialists and people specialists.

Software consultancy firm Equal Experts secured third place for a flat hierarchical structural meaning that staff are able to carry out decisions without express permission from managers.

A flat hierarchy was also the reason Silicon Valley giant Facebook was awarded 11th place.

The tech giant was topped by car seller Auto Trader and Rentokil Initial, a pest control business that says its approach to management is “one of open, accessible [and] responsible leadership”.

Also on the top 20 list were energy supplier First Utility, travel-tech firm Skyscanner, global consultancy firm Bain & Co and dating app Badoo.

The findings are based on online reviews posted on Glassdoor by current and former employees of more than 700,000 companies.

Patrick Woodman, head of research at CMI, said companies featured in the top 20 lead the way in management style and motivating employees.

“Traditionally, getting on at work meant getting into management and climbing the ladder, but this hasn’t always led to a perfect fit between people’s skills and the demands of the role – especially when employers spend too little on training”, he said.

“Many of the best employers are now changing how they do things to make sure they put people with the right skills in the management roles that are critical to their company’s success.”

Joe Wiggins, head of European communications at Glassdoor, said: “Organisations that have a strong culture will attract the best people, and in turn, this will lead to stronger financial performance”.

“Culture is so important as it is second only to salary in terms of influence on a job candidate’s decision to join an employer,” he added.

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