African and Middle Eastern countries remain world's poorest, IMF data shows

In 28 countries, people live on less than £750 per year

Will Martin
Friday 01 June 2018 22:21
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Sierra Leone was ranked the tenth poorest country, according to the IMF data
Sierra Leone was ranked the tenth poorest country, according to the IMF data

African and Middle Eastern countries ravaged by war and famine remain the poorest in the world, according to data published by the International Monetary Fund.

Twice a year the IMF releases a huge dump of data about the economic power of the world's nations, with gross domestic product (GDP) per capita a key statistic.

The IMF ranks the world's countries according to purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita.

The PPP takes into account the relative cost of living and the inflation rates of the countries to compare living standards among the different nations.

Most of the countries populating the top of this ranking are under authoritarian regimes where corruption is rampant. This a big deterrent to foreign investors, even if some of those countries have huge amounts of natural resources.

We've included all the countries with a GDP per capita is below $1,000 per year.

28. Sudan -- GDP per capita: $992

27. Benin -- $966

26. Chad -- $919

25. Nepal -- $918

24. Mali -- $917

23. Guinea-Bissau -- $910

22. Ethiopia -- $909

21. Comoros -- $869

20. Tajikistan -- $848

19. Haiti -- $847

18. Rwanda -- $819

17. Guinea -- $816

16. Burkina Faso -- $750

15. Liberia -- $722

14. Uganda -- $711

13. Togo -- $698

12. Afghanistan -- $601

11. Niger -- $510

10. Sierra Leone -- $505

9. The Gambia -- $500

8. Madagascar -- $479

7. Democratic Republic of Congo -- $477

6. Mozambique -- $472

5. Yemen -- $449

4. Central African Republic -- $425

3. Malawi -- $342

2. Burundi -- $339

1. South Sudan -- $246

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