GCSE results day 2017: When is it? What if I can't collect my grades in person? Everything you need to know

Be prepared with our handy guide

Rachael Pells
Education Correspondent
Monday 31 July 2017 12:45
Comments
Withington Girls' School pupils react as they open their GCSE exam results
Withington Girls' School pupils react as they open their GCSE exam results

The build-up to GCSE results day can be intense – for both pupils and parents.

For many students these will be the first formal exams they've ever faced, and seeing the finalised grades on paper can feel hugely significant.

Make sure you’re feeling relaxed and prepared with our handy guide

When is GCSE results day?

You can collect those much-anticipated grades on Thursday August 24.

This year will be the first time a new number-based grading system will be used instead of the traditional A*-G grades from previous cohorts.

This means for certain subjects, pupils will receive a score from 1-9.

How do I collect my results?

All results are dispatched to schools electronically to schools in advance, but you’ll need to go into your school to receive them and pick up a hard copy breakdown of the grades.

Check what time your institution will open on the day – it’s most likely to be listed on the school or college website.

What if I can’t collect them in person?

If you’re going away and it’s unavoidable, you might be able to arrange for them to be sent to you via email or through the post.

Alternatively, you can nominate someone else – a friend or family member – to go to the school on your behalf.

This must be agreed by the school beforehand, along with a letter of consent signed by you.

I’ve got my results, what happens next?

The results will hopefully give you confirmation of your place at sixth form or college – check the criteria for your chosen course/s.

If you are unsure, speak to the school or college administrators.

Could you pass a GCSE exam?

What if I’ve done badly?

If you didn’t get the grades you hoped for, don’t panic. It may be that you can resit an exam – lots of people end up retaking maths, for example, as it’s a subject many further education institutions and workplaces require a pass grade in.

If you are going on to do A Levels, you can usually resit maths and English exams in November of your first term of Year 12 without having to delay the start date.

If you’ve just missed out on a higher grade boundary, it might be a good idea to request a remark. Your teachers can help advise the next step.

Consider your options

There are lots of other pathways into work and further education if you don’t manage to get in to your A level courses – or if you change your mind.

Take a look at the wide range of BTECs and apprenticeship schemes available to school graduates.

Good luck!

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