Ofsted finds 130 schools showing no signs of improvement in ten years in damning report

Chief Inspector of Schools report reveals institutions unable to score a 'good' inspection grade since 2005

Wednesday 13 December 2017 09:33
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Of the 20,000 schools in the country, 500 of those for children of primary age and 200 for over-11s have failed to make the grade
Of the 20,000 schools in the country, 500 of those for children of primary age and 200 for over-11s have failed to make the grade

More than 100 schools have not improved in the last 10 years, education watchdog Ofsted is expected to say.

The annual report by the Chief Inspector of Schools being released on Wednesday is expected to show that 130 schools have failed to record a “good” inspection since 2005.

It is reported that of the 20,000 schools in the country, 500 of those for children of primary age and 200 for over-11s have failed to make the grade.

However, 90% of all primary schools and nearly 80% of all secondary schools are rated good or outstanding, the report will say.

Shadow education secretary Angela Rayner said schools were struggling with Government policies which had created problems with teachers' pay and recruitment while driving up their workload.

She told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: “The Government have missed their teacher recruitment target. One in three of our Sure Start centres have closed. Many teachers have lost up to £5,000 of their real-terms wage over this period.

“But it's not just about money... (it's) the workload, the pace of change, the difficulty with restrictions and being able to give every child those opportunities. The chief of Ofsted has raised these issues.”

Ms Rayner said it was “not enough” for the Government to focus on geographical areas regarded as having fallen behind in terms of social mobility.

“Some of our most vulnerable children... have been failed by this Government's policies,” she said. “We have got to start addressing that issue. Just dealing with the opportunity areas is not enough. Ofsted is quite clear that it is not about areas in particular, it's schools that are still not able to raise their standards and raise their game.”

PA

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