Government announces seven new university technical colleges

 

Richard Garner
Monday 11 August 2014 10:23
Comments
The Government has been accused of lacking enthusiasm for vocational education in the past
The Government has been accused of lacking enthusiasm for vocational education in the past

A major expansion for the network of top-class university technical colleges for 14 to 18-year-olds has been given the go-ahead by ministers.

Seven new colleges, which will offer vocational education to teenagers in a bid to meet the demands of modern industry, are to be founded across the country, bringing the total to 57.

A further tranche is expected to be approved early in the New Year, which will bring the total to around 70 either approved or starting by the time of the election campaign.

The go-ahead for the seven is seen as a sign of the renewed commitment of the Coalition government to the project, which is the brainchild of former Conservative Education Secretary Kenneth [now Lord] Baker.

In the past, critics accused former Education Secretary Michael Gove of lacking enthusiasm for vocational education even though projects were approved.

In all, the seven new projects will teach 5,000 pupils when fully operational, bringing the total number in UTCs to 50,000.

Top industries are backing the scheme with Jaguar, Bentley, Unilever and Kodak amongst the business sponsors. All UTCS have one higher education sponsor as well as those from business.

In Jaguar’s case. the UTC it is sponsoring in Coventry, following backing for another in the Midlands at Solihull.

“They can’t recruit enough engineers of sufficient quality,” Lord Baker told The Independent.

The seven approved are: Bromley UTC, Crewe, Leeds, Scarborough, Sheffield Human science and Digital Technologies, South Durham, and WMG Academy for Young Engineers in Solihull.

Announcing the expansion plans, Chancellor George Osborne said: "The new colleges will provide the next generation of British workers with the skills they need to secure the high-tech jobs of the future."

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged in