Daily pill could help men with advanced prostate cancer, study says

Overall, the risk of death decreased by around a third among men receiving enzalutamide, the researchers said

Monday 03 June 2019 00:30
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A daily pill could offer an alternative life-extending treatment for men suffering from prostate cancer, new research suggests.

Enzalutamide, a drug that works by blocking the effect of testosterone on prostate cancer cells, has shown modest benefits for patients with advanced prostate cancer in an international study led by the Australian and New Zealand Urogenital and Prostate (ANZUP) Cancer Trials Group.

The study consisted of giving 1,125 men with advanced prostate cancer an injection of testosterone-suppressing medicine, and either a daily enzalutamide tablet or one of three standard treatments.

Four in five (80 per cent) of the men who received enzalutamide were alive after three years, the study found, compared to 72 per cent of those who received the standard treatment.

Overall, the risk of death decreased by around a third among men receiving enzalutamide, the researchers said.

The initial findings of the study, presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in Chicago, indicate the medicine could also benefit patients when used alongside hormone injections, as soon as they are diagnosed with metastatic cancer.

Christopher Sweeney, one of the lead researchers, from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, US, said: “Physicians and patients with prostate cancer now have a new treatment option with enzalutamide, and this is especially relevant for men who cannot tolerate chemotherapy and have a lower burden of disease seen on scans.”

Enzalutamide is already available on the NHS for men with prostate cancer who are no longer responding to hormone injections.

Dr Matthew Hobbs, deputy director of research at Prostate Cancer UK, described the findings as “positive”, but said the treatment does not appear to be more effective than the current UK standard of chemotherapy and hormone injections, and is more expensive.”

Chemotherapy drug docetaxel and abiraterone, which also switches off testosterone production, have similarly been shown to boost life expectancy among men with this advanced form of the disease.

“Prostate Cancer UK is funding research that will help clarify whether there are any significant differences in the benefits these treatments can provide, and whether certain groups of men respond better to each,” said Dr Hobbs.

“This should help lead to more personalised treatment decisions in the future, so each man gets the most effective choice for him.”

Additional reporting by PA.

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