Bruce Springsteen condemned for 'bully tactic' for protesting over anti-LGBT law

'It's like when a kid gets upset and says he's going to take his ball and go home,' says US congressman

Maya Oppenheim
Tuesday 12 April 2016 11:26
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Mark Walker a Republican freshman congressman who represents some areas of Greensboro has criticised the iconic singer’s decision
Mark Walker a Republican freshman congressman who represents some areas of Greensboro has criticised the iconic singer’s decision

Bruce Springsteen’s decision to call off a concert in North Carolina over an anti-LGBT law has been condemned as a “bully tactic” by a US congressman.

The 66-year-old American rocker cancelled the gig in Greensboro on Sunday because of a controversial new law which is deemed to legalise discrimination against the LGBT community. The Public Facilities Privacy and Security Act dictates which bathrooms transgender people are allowed to use and relinquishes anti-discrimination protections for LGBT people.

Mark Walker, a Republican freshman congressman who represents some areas of Greensboro, has criticised the iconic singer’s decision.

“It's disappointing he's not following through on his commitments,” Walker told The Hollywood Reporter.

Walker then likened Springsteen’s decision to that of a child. “Bruce is known to be on the radical left and he's got every right to be so, but I consider this a bully tactic. It's like when a kid gets upset and says he's going to take his ball and go home”.

The new legislation changes the definition of sex in the statewide anti-discrimination law to sex at birth, requiring individuals to use bathrooms which correspond to their biological sex.

Springsteen rebuked the new law in a statement posted on his website, expressing his “deepest apologies” for cancelling the show.

“The law also attacks the rights of LGBT citizens to sue when their human rights are violated in the workplace. No other group of North Carolinians faces such a burden,” he wrote.

The Born in the USA star concluded by saying that the new law overrides the issue of music. “Some things are more important than a rock show and this fight against prejudice and bigotry - which is happening as I write - is one of them.”

A number of companies such as Netflix and Disney have pledged to relocate productions in North Carolina if the bill becomes law and most recently, Paypal have decided to cancel plans to open a new global operations centre in the state. On top of this, the National Basketball Association have said it may relocate the 2017 All-Star game from the state.

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