David Cameron: The surprising description of him that he 'hated'

Enough to call and complain 

Heather Saul
Wednesday 13 July 2016 17:05
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David Cameron departs 10 Downing Street for his last Prime Minister's Questions in the House of Commons
David Cameron departs 10 Downing Street for his last Prime Minister's Questions in the House of Commons

David Cameron has been called many names during his premiership.

His divisive policies, almost six years of austerity and headlines no one but Charlie Brooker could have prophesied have seen the Prime Minister referred to in a variety of ways, and not all of them flattering.

But there is one term that apparently riled him more than others.

Francis Elliot, Political Editor at The Times, became acquainted with the PM after he assumed office and went on to write a biography of his life with James Hanning, former Deputy Editor of The Independent on Sunday, Cameron: Practically a Conservative, published in 2007.

The book included a number of details about Mr Cameron he would no doubt rather did not go into print. But one Mr Elliot claims he took particular issue with was a description of him as someone who could win a medal in “chillaxing” because of his reportedly laid-back approach to weekends and his “post-lunch naps”.

He recalls how Mr Cameron took such umbrage at the term that he called his editor to complain.

Mr Elliot writes: “In later editions of the book we quoted a close friend who said he would win a gold medal in 'chillaxing' for his relaxed weekends of tennis, wine and post-lunch naps at Chequers. He hated that. Enough to let my boss at the time know just how much he hated that.”

David Cameron's 5 worst moments at PMQs

Mr Cameron’s reign has come to a close as his successor prepared to assume office. As per tradition, he spent his last day in office trading jibes with his opponents in a lively Prime Minister’s Questions.

He concluded the session with a surreal sign off that promises to turn him into the ultimate meme: a picture of himself with Larry the cat, to fend off suggestions he was not overly enamoured with Downing Street's principal mouse catcher.

Read more about Mr Cameron's final hours at the helm of British politics here.

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