Mummified remains of 30,000 year old baby mammoth found in Canadian gold fields

First near-complete and best-preserved mummified woolly mammoth found in North America

Scientists think they can bring back the wooly mammoths

A miner working in Canada’s Klondike gold fields has found near-complete, mummified remains of a baby woolly mammoth that lived more than 30,000 years ago.

Indigenous people living in the region have named the mammoth calf Nun cho ga, meaning “big baby animal” in the Han language.

Analysis suggests the calf is a female, roughly the same size as the 42,000-year-old mummified infant woolly mammoth “Lyuba” that was discovered in Siberia in 2007.

Geologists, including those from the Yukon Geological Survey and the University of Calgary in Canada, who recovered the well-preserved remains say Nun cho ga likely died and was frozen during the Ice Age.

The new discovery is the first near-complete and best-preserved mummified woolly mammoth found in North America, according to researchers.

“As an ice age palaeontologist, it has been one of my lifelong dreams to come face to face with a real woolly mammoth. That dream came true today,” Yukon palaeontologist Grant Zazula said.

“Nun cho ga is beautiful and one of the most incredible mummified Ice Age animals ever discovered in the world. I am excited to get to know her more,” Dr Zazula said.

In the coming months, the Trʼondek Hwechʼin council and the government of Yukon say they would work together to preserve and learn more about Nun cho ga and share these stories and information with the community of Dawson City, residents of Yukon and the global scientific community.

“This is a remarkable recovery for our First Nation, and we look forward to collaborating with the Yukon government on the next steps in the process for moving forward with these remains in a way that honours our traditions, culture, and laws,” Tr’ondek Hwech’in chief Roberta Joseph said.

The remains, researchers say, provide a detailed glimpse into the prehistoric time when Nun cho ga roamed the Yukon alongside wild horses, cave lions, and giant steppe bison.

“We are thrilled about this significant discovery of a mummified woolly mammoth calf: Nun cho ga. Without strong partnerships between placer miners, Trʼondek Hwechʼin, and the Yukon government, discoveries like this could not happen,” Ranj Pillai, Yukon’s minister of tourism and culture, said in a statement.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in