#Fieldworkfail: Scientists reveal their most embarrassing mistakes in the field

Dangerous animals and swamped vehicles feature heavily in the scientific blunders

Alice Harrold
Friday 07 August 2015 21:10
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Drugged zebra gets stuck in a tree in example of a fieldwork fail
Drugged zebra gets stuck in a tree in example of a fieldwork fail

Researchers around the world have taken to Twitter to share their funniest and strangest fieldwork errors.

Scientists have shown all the things that can go wrong for them in the wild using the Twitter hashtag #fieldworkfail.

From accidentally swallowing fossils to falling out of a boat in crocodile infested waters, fieldwork fails range from the bemusing to the bizarre.

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