Steven Clark: Police investigating cold case release mysterious letter naming ‘killer’

Cleveland Police were sent a letter in 1999 that claimed to know the name of the person allegedly responsible for the death of Steven Clark

<p>Police treated the 23-year-old’s mysterious disappearance as murder following a recent cold case review, although his body has not been found</p>

Police treated the 23-year-old’s mysterious disappearance as murder following a recent cold case review, although his body has not been found

Police investigating the murder of a man who went missing on a family walk in 1992 have released an excerpt of an anonymous letter that claims to know who killed him.

Cleveland Police were sent the letter in 1999 that named the person allegedly responsible for the death of Steven Clark, who disappeared from his home in Marske, near Redcar.

Mr Clark's elderly parents Doris and Charles were arrested and questioned about his death and their home was searched in September this year.

They have denied any responsibility and his mother described the situation as "absolutely ludicrous".

Police treated the 23-year-old's mysterious disappearance as murder following a recent cold-case review, although his body has not been found.

Cleveland Police have now released an excerpt from an anonymous letter.

The force previously released an image of the envelope used.

Detective Chief Inspector Shaun Page, who is leading the investigation, said: "This letter is just one of several key lines of enquiry in the case.

"The letter was sent to Guisborough police station and is very precise in nature.

"The letter writer intimated that Steven was dead and that they claim to know the person responsible.

"It was 21 years ago, so the letter writer could have died since then, but if anyone recognises the handwriting, we would urge them to get in touch."

Mr Page added: "Steven left his personal belongings at home when he disappeared. His wallet, glasses, and watch.

"He was a sociable character and was liked by the friends who knew him.

"He had lived in South Africa until he was around the age of 20, having moved there when he was younger. His life in Marske was different from the more restricted way of life overseas."

A missing person's report at the time he vanished stated Mr Clark was on a family walk on December 28 1992 when he used a public toilet in Saltburn at around 3pm.

According to the report, his mother used the ladies, waited for him to come out, then assumed he had gone home when he failed to leave, so she expected him to arrive at the house.

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