French senators meet with Taiwan's Tsai at tense time

A group of French senators visiting Taiwan as part of a regular parliamentary exchange met with President Tsai Ing-wen during a trip that comes in a particularly tense moment between Taiwan and China

Via AP news wire
Thursday 07 October 2021 03:56
Taiwan France Visit
Taiwan France Visit

A group of French senators visiting Taiwan as part of a regular parliamentary exchange met with President Tsai Ing-wen on Thursday morning during a trip that comes in a particularly tense moment between Taiwan and China

Tsai spoke briefly before their meeting, giving France's former defense minister, Alain Richard, the Order of Propitious Clouds, a distinction recognizing “his contributions to Taiwan-France relations.” She thanked him for leading an effort in the French Senate to pass a resolution in support of allowing Taiwan to participate in international organizations like the World Health Organization.

China claims self-ruled Taiwan as its own territory and opposes any international engagement with the island that suggest a separate status, such as WHO membership and meetings with foreign government officials. It tried to discourage the French senators' visit, with its embassy in France saying ahead of the trip that it would undermine Chinese-French relations.

Richard along with the three other senators also plan to meet Taiwanese economic and health officials and the Mainland Affairs Council on their five-day visit. This is the third visit to Taiwan for Richard, a former French defense minister, who previously visited Taiwan in 2015 and 2018. He heads the Taiwan Friendship group in the French Senate.

The senators' trip is a recurrent one that French lawmakers make as part of the Taiwan Friendship group, especially as new senators are elected every three years.

Tsai is also due to meet with former Australian prime minister Tony Abbott on Thursday.

China and Taiwan split amid civil war in 1949, and China has increasingly mobilized military, diplomatic and economic pressure to undermine Tsai’s independence-leaning administration while threatening to bring the island under Chinese Communist Party control.

Taiwan’s defense minister described the current situation as the most severe in 40 years.

In its most recent display of sustained military harassment, China flew fighter jets 149 times toward Taiwan over four days from last Friday to Monday.

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken speaking in Paris on Wednesday on an official visit, said the Chinese military flights towards Taiwan were “destabilizing.”

“We strongly urge Beijing to cease its military, diplomatic and economic pressure and coercion directed at Taiwan,” he said.

China has often pointed to U.S. selling weapons to Taiwan and its ships navigating the Taiwan Strait as provocative actions.

The flights were in international airspace but prompted Taiwanese defense forces to scramble in response. Analysts say the flights display China's increasing military advancement as the U.S. and other rivals are pushing back against China's assertions of territorial ambitions.

—- Associated Press writer Sylvie Corbet in Paris contributed to this report.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged in