Queen thanked by Archbishop for ‘staying the course’

The Archbishop of York delivered a sermon at the National Service of Thanksgiving at St Paul’s Cathedral in London.

A Guard of Honour on the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral, London, ahead of the National Service of Thanksgiving, on day two of the Platinum Jubilee celebrations for Queen Elizabeth II. Picture date: Friday June 3, 2022.
A Guard of Honour on the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral, London, ahead of the National Service of Thanksgiving, on day two of the Platinum Jubilee celebrations for Queen Elizabeth II. Picture date: Friday June 3, 2022.

The Queen is “still in the saddle”, the Archbishop of York has said, as he thanked her for “staying the course”.

In his sermon for the National Service of Thanksgiving at St Paul’s Cathedral, The Most Rev Stephen Cottrell compared the monarch’s well-known love of horse racing to her long reign, suggesting it “reflects the distance of Aintree more than the sprints of Epsom”.

The Queen bowed out of attending Friday morning’s event in central London after suffering “discomfort” following the first day of festivities for her Platinum Jubilee.

With endurance, through times of change and challenge, joy and sorrow, she continues to offer herself in the service of our country and the Commonwealth

The Most Rev Stephen Cottrell

During his sermon, Mr Cottrell told the congregation, which included senior members of the royal family, he was “sorry” the Queen could not attend, but glad there is “still more to come”.

He said: “It is well known that Her Majesty likes horse racing.

“I don’t have any great tips for the Derby tomorrow, but since the scriptures describe life as a race set before us, let me observe that her long reign reflects the distance of Aintree more than the sprints of Epsom.

“Certainly, less dressage than most people imagine.

“But with endurance, through times of change and challenge, joy and sorrow, she continues to offer herself in the service of our country and the Commonwealth.

“Your Majesty, we’re sorry you’re not with us this morning in person, but you are still in the saddle. And we are all glad that there is still more to come.”

Guests arriving for the National Service of Thanksgiving at St Paul’s Cathedral (PA)

Mr Cottrell stepped in at late notice to deliver the sermon after the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Rev Justin Welby, contracted Covid-19.

In his address, the archbishop said the best leaders are those who “know how to be led” and “lead for others, not themselves”.

“People whose heart’s desire is to serve the common good and build up the common life; who don’t try to do it all themselves, or act in their own strength alone; people who take a longer view; and who seek out places of replenishing, even places where they might learn the mind of Christ,” he said.

“I say this today, knowing that in Her Majesty the Queen we see an example of this kind of service; a staunch constancy and a steadfast consistency; a faithfulness to God, an obedience to a vocation that is the bedrock of her life.”

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