Ghislaine Maxwell juror: Victims’ testimony ‘showed pattern’ of grooming

A juror, identified as Scotty David, said the prosecution witnesses had corroborated each other with their evidence.

Josh Payne
Wednesday 05 January 2022 11:21
Ghislaine Maxwell with Jeffrey Epstein (PA)
Ghislaine Maxwell with Jeffrey Epstein (PA)

A juror in the sex trafficking trial of predatory British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell has said her victims’ testimony “showed a pattern” of how they were all groomed.

Maxwell, 60, who was labelled “dangerous” by the prosecution during her three-week, New York trial, helped entice vulnerable teenagers to Jeffrey Epstein’s various properties for him to sexually abuse between 1994 and 2004.

Now juror Scotty David, who wished to be identified by his first and middle name, told the Independent he believed all the victims who testified in the case.

He said all accusers corroborated each other and were supported by other evidence.

Juror Scotty David said all the victims showed a pattern of grooming (US Department of Justice/PA)

Scotty David, who said he was a victim of sexual abuse himself, told the Independent: “This verdict is for all the victims.

“For those who testified, for those who came forward and for those who haven’t come forward.

“I’m glad that Maxwell has been held accountable.

“This verdict shows that you can be found guilty, no matter your status.”

Addressing the testimony of the victims, Scotty David said: “They were all believable. Nothing they said felt to me like a lie.

“I know what happened when I was sexually abused.

“I remember the colour of the carpet, the walls. Some of it can be replayed like a video.

This verdict shows that you can be found guilty, no matter your status

Scotty David, juror in the Ghislaine Maxwell trial

“But I can’t remember all the details, there are some things that run together.”

Commenting on questions over why the victims kept going back to Epstein and Maxwell, Scotty David said: “We are not here to judge these victims.

“We are here to judge whether we believe their stories, but we are not here to judge the decisions they made or didn’t make.

“We cannot judge what they did or didn’t do afterward.

“It doesn’t change that it happened.”

Scotty David told The Independent that one of the accusers, who testified under the pseudonym “Kate”, powerfully corroborated the stories of the other victims, despite not being able to be considered for the charges on the indictment due to being over the age of consent in the UK when the abuse happened.

“She was able to show us that this was a pattern,” he said.

“We knew we couldn’t use her testimony to convict Maxwell, but she showed the pattern of how those girls were groomed.

“She showed us the pattern that happened to all of these girls.

Scotty David said what Maxwell did was ‘wrong’ (US Department of Justice/PA)

“It was about confusing their boundaries.

“For Jane it started with seeing Maxwell topless. For Annie Farmer, it started with Maxwell showing her how to give Epstein a foot massage.

“The pattern is that Ghislaine talks to you like she is also a teenager. Then it moves into massage.

“She tries to make you comfortable, to see what they can get away with.

“What she did was wrong.”

Scotty David said Maxwell’s “little black book”, which had names of the victims listed under “masseuses”, helped the jury understand how she and Epstein had evaded justice in the past.

He said: “Those girls’ names and phone numbers were listed next to the words, mom and dad.

“Professional masseuses do not need their parents with them.”

Addressing why they found Maxwell not guilty on one count, which alleged she enticed accuser “Jane” across state lines, he said: “We simply didn’t see enough direct evidence to convict on count two.

“It wasn’t about not believing Jane.

“I personally was willing to find her guilty on count two.

“But we all decided in the end that there wasn’t enough evidence.”

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