Sir Frederick Barclay evicted and financially supported by nephews, court told

The businessman is embroiled in a legal battle over a divorce payout.

Nina Lloyd
Thursday 24 March 2022 19:28
Sir Frederick Barclay (Kirsty O’Connor/PA)
Sir Frederick Barclay (Kirsty O’Connor/PA)

Businessman Sir Frederick Barclay has been “evicted” from his flat and is being financially supported by his nephews as he fights a legal battle over a £100 million divorce payout, the High Court heard.

The 87-year-old is facing committal proceedings after his ex-wife, Lady Hiroko Barclay said he breached court orders to hand over money following the breakdown of a 34-year marriage.

Lawyers representing Sir Frederick said at a hearing on Thursday he has insufficient funds and is being lent money by his family to pay for part of his legal fees.

Lady Barclay attended dressed in black with pearl earrings as her lawyer, Stewart Leech QC, said she was in a “considerably worse situation” following her ex-husband’s failure to pay her.

Mr Leech previously said Lady Barclay was asking a judge to commit her ex-husband to jail for breaching an order to produce documents and pay a £50 million tranche of their settlement.

The High Court ruled in May that Lady Barclay should receive lump sums totalling £100 million from the businessman.

But a maintenance payment of £60,000 has been “unilaterally halved” and she has “not received the capital she was supposed to receive”, the Family Division of the High Court in London heard.

Sir Frederick is also “significantly in default of payment of legal fees,” the court was told.

Lady Hiroko Barclay (Kirsty O’Connor/PA)

Charles Howard QC, representing the businessman, acknowledged certain sums had not been paid but said: “Whether he’s at fault remains to be decided.

“He says he’s got no money to do it and his bank statements… show that.”

“He’s been evicted from his home,” the barrister added.

Mr Howard previously argued Lady Barclay would have to show Sir Frederick had the “means to meet” the £50 million and had “wilfully refused or neglected” to pay.

Judge Sir Jonathan Cohen adjourned the matter “to obtain further evidence as to Sir Frederick’s (mental) capacity.”

He also ordered the businessman to pay £20,000 to pay for a single joint expert, an individual appointed to provide outside expertise in court cases, by 12 noon on Monday.

“We are quietly confident that we will be able to get the funds via the nephew,” Mr Howard said.

The next hearing is due to take place on April 6.

Sir Frederick was recently embroiled in separate High Court litigation with his nephews over the bugging of his conversations at The Ritz hotel.

The court previously heard the sons of Sir Frederick’s late twin brother Sir David, Aidan, Howard and Alistair, had made the secret recordings at the London landmark over a number of months.

However, the family said the case had been settled in June.

The Barclay brothers were among the UK’s most high-profile businessmen before Sir David died.

Their interests have included The Ritz and the Telegraph Newspaper Group.

Both also had links to the Channel Islands and Monaco.

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