George Thomas: Voyeur jailed for secretly filming thousands of strangers in toilets of London coffee shops

The father-of-one matched recordings of people in public places with covert footage from toilets to create compilation films for 'sexual gratification'

Elsa Vulliamy
Tuesday 22 December 2015 18:32
The 38 year old pled guilty to 15 charges.
The 38 year old pled guilty to 15 charges.

A former Ernst and Young manager has been jailed for four years for secretly filming thousands of people on cameras he installed in toilets and shower rooms at his office and in several London coffee shops.

George Thomas, who also put hidden cameras in the bathroom, shower and bedrooms at his own home, filmed more 3,500 people before downloading photos of strangers’ naked body parts onto his work computer in what police are calling the biggest case of voyeurism they have ever seen.

The married father-of-one's collection included photos of children and babies.

Detective Constable Sarah Gardner, of the Metropolitan Police, said: "Thomas’s offending was extraordinary, not just because of the sheer numbers of people he filmed but also due to the highly organised way, in which he saved, stored and filed the footage.”

An Ernst and Young employee – who only learned what had happened in their work place after Thomas was convicted - said: “I felt physically sick when I found out. I’m worried that my friends have been filmed and I’m disappointed in my company for not noticing for nearly six years."

The 38-year-old, of Glaisher Street, Deptford, pleaded guilty to 15 charges including voyeurism and taking indecent images of children and was given a four-year jail sentence and a 10-year sexual harm prevention order.

Thomas matched recordings of people in public places with covert recordings from the lavatory in order to create compilation films for “sexual gratification”.

The recordings were being taken for six years from 2009, before Thomas was caught when a female colleague discovered a recording device, on which there were images of Thomas’ face in the process of hiding the device.

A spokesperson form Ernst and Young said: “These criminal charges concern a disturbing invasion of individual privacy which we find appalling. We have been doing everything we can to support those individuals from EY affected and to assist the police in their ongoing investigation. The individual has now been convicted and sentenced.”

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