Attempt to extradite gay British man to United Arab Emirates rejected

Michael Halliday has a spoken of his relief, with sex between men punishable by death under UAE federal law

Jonathan Owen
Tuesday 22 December 2015 18:35
Comments
Dubai's interpretation of sharia law has lead to a number of rape victims being criminalised including women from Norway and Australia, and several previous British victims
Dubai's interpretation of sharia law has lead to a number of rape victims being criminalised including women from Norway and Australia, and several previous British victims

Michael Halliday, a 32-year-old gay Briton, has spoken of his relief after an attempt to extradite him by the United Arab Emirates (UAE) was rejected due to fears he would face torture and an unfair trial.

Mr Halliday denies an allegation that he stole more than £100,000 in cash from a shop he managed in Dubai. In a ruling at Westminster Magistrate’s Court, London District Judge Jeremy Coleman concluded: “Mr Halliday has proved to the required degree that in the event of extradition there is a substantial risk that both his Article 3 and 6 rights would be breached.”

In a statement, the 32-year-old, from the Midlands, said: “I have been through a distressing eight months of uncertainty.”

He added: “It is not the clearing of my name that I feared. It was more a serious question as to whether there was a realistic prospect of me being able to prove my innocence at trial given the UAE's unfair justice system and their poor track record in their treatment of foreign prisoners and particularly members of the LGBT community.”

His lawyers, BSB solicitors, had argued that his human rights would have been in even greater danger of being violated due to his sexuality, with sex between men punishable by death under UAE federal law.

“I can now continue my life without fear of the prospect of extradition,” said Mr Halliday.

He vowed to fight any appeal against the ruling, describing the UAE as a “regime where I fear for my personal safety.”

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in